2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148028
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring for the Navajo: A People Who Walk in Beauty
Abstract:
Caring for the Navajo: A People Who Walk in Beauty
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Moshier, Catherine B., MSN, APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:United States Public Health Service/ Bureau of Prisons
Co-Authors:Gilbert Tolino, N/A
A collage of photos can depict a facet of community health nursing practice. The Indian Health Service of the United States has utilized Community Health Nurses to provide health care to Native Americans for many years. These photos depict community health nursing among the diverse culture of the Navajo people. The pictures show the Navajo people, the land where they live and their creativity in weaving and dance. Community Health Nurses care for families on the Navajo land. Many of their homes do not have running water or electricity. The use of community wells is a common practice. Travel is often on dirt roads to reach some families so 4-wheel drive vehicles are used for transportation to make home visits. It may take many years to build nurse-patient relationships within the community. Trust is built by repeated encounters with community members. Traditions of language may be a barrier to care since some elders speak only their native language of Navajo. The assistance of skilled Navajo interpreters is essential. Community Health Nurses may be assigned as school nurses on the reservation providing health care and teaching health promotion. The treasure of the Navajo people is their children. The Navajo are descendents of an ancient people continuing the celebration of life in the traditions of weaving and dance. The Navajo survive in a land where time seems to stand still. They walk in the beauty that surrounds them.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring for the Navajo: A People Who Walk in Beautyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148028-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caring for the Navajo: A People Who Walk in Beauty</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moshier, Catherine B., MSN, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">United States Public Health Service/ Bureau of Prisons</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cbmoshier@mindspring.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gilbert Tolino, N/A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A collage of photos can depict a facet of community health nursing practice. The Indian Health Service of the United States has utilized Community Health Nurses to provide health care to Native Americans for many years. These photos depict community health nursing among the diverse culture of the Navajo people. The pictures show the Navajo people, the land where they live and their creativity in weaving and dance. Community Health Nurses care for families on the Navajo land. Many of their homes do not have running water or electricity. The use of community wells is a common practice. Travel is often on dirt roads to reach some families so 4-wheel drive vehicles are used for transportation to make home visits. It may take many years to build nurse-patient relationships within the community. Trust is built by repeated encounters with community members. Traditions of language may be a barrier to care since some elders speak only their native language of Navajo. The assistance of skilled Navajo interpreters is essential. Community Health Nurses may be assigned as school nurses on the reservation providing health care and teaching health promotion. The treasure of the Navajo people is their children. The Navajo are descendents of an ancient people continuing the celebration of life in the traditions of weaving and dance. The Navajo survive in a land where time seems to stand still. They walk in the beauty that surrounds them.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.