The Development of Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prediction and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers Using a Transdisciplinary Approach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148030
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Development of Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prediction and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers Using a Transdisciplinary Approach
Abstract:
The Development of Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prediction and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers Using a Transdisciplinary Approach
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Murray, Linda D., FRCNA, AFCHSE
P.I. Institution Name:Edith Cowan University
This paper will describe the development and publication of Australian Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prediction and Prevention of Pressure ulcers. Pressure ulcers have been identified as a worldwide problem that have influenced patient /client morbidity and mortality. The literature identified that the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitals ranges from 2.7 to 29.5 per cent, with prevalence rates ranging from 9.2 to 66 per cent. Australian studies have identified prevalence rates at the lower end of this range. The Australian Wound Management Association Inc. (AWMA) is a national body with membership drawn from health care professionals. AWMA aims to promote increased awareness, knowledge and the application of effective wound management. In 1996, the AWMA Pressure Ulcer Interest Sub-committee (PUISC) was formed. This PUISC consisted of 19 transdisiciplinary representatives with a wealth of professional expertise in a range of health care settings. The objectives of the Sub-committee were to: * develop national clinical guidelines to identify adults at risk°¨ of developing pressure ulcers and outline interventions for prevention; * collate national published data on the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers in Australia; * produce an inventory of pressure reducing and pressure relieving equipment; and * disseminate and update the guidelines. In 2001, AWMA published Clinical Practice Guidelines designed to assist health care professionals and consumers to make appropriate clinical decisions. These guidelines provide recommendations regarding the delivery of quality care across a range of health care settings and are designed to assist decision making, based on the best information available at the date of publication. The Guidelines have stimulated further research in the area of pressure ulcer prevention and management. A doctoral candidate is undertaking research to identify the effect on pressure ulcer prevalence in tertiary institutions folowing the introduction of the guidelines.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Development of Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prediction and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers Using a Transdisciplinary Approachen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148030-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Development of Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prediction and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers Using a Transdisciplinary Approach</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Murray, Linda D., FRCNA, AFCHSE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Edith Cowan University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">linda.murray@ecu.edu.au</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This paper will describe the development and publication of Australian Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prediction and Prevention of Pressure ulcers. Pressure ulcers have been identified as a worldwide problem that have influenced patient /client morbidity and mortality. The literature identified that the incidence of pressure ulcers in hospitals ranges from 2.7 to 29.5 per cent, with prevalence rates ranging from 9.2 to 66 per cent. Australian studies have identified prevalence rates at the lower end of this range. The Australian Wound Management Association Inc. (AWMA) is a national body with membership drawn from health care professionals. AWMA aims to promote increased awareness, knowledge and the application of effective wound management. In 1996, the AWMA Pressure Ulcer Interest Sub-committee (PUISC) was formed. This PUISC consisted of 19 transdisiciplinary representatives with a wealth of professional expertise in a range of health care settings. The objectives of the Sub-committee were to: * develop national clinical guidelines to identify adults at risk&deg;&uml; of developing pressure ulcers and outline interventions for prevention; * collate national published data on the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers in Australia; * produce an inventory of pressure reducing and pressure relieving equipment; and * disseminate and update the guidelines. In 2001, AWMA published Clinical Practice Guidelines designed to assist health care professionals and consumers to make appropriate clinical decisions. These guidelines provide recommendations regarding the delivery of quality care across a range of health care settings and are designed to assist decision making, based on the best information available at the date of publication. The Guidelines have stimulated further research in the area of pressure ulcer prevention and management. A doctoral candidate is undertaking research to identify the effect on pressure ulcer prevalence in tertiary institutions folowing the introduction of the guidelines.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.