Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated morphologic/metabolic changes and health-related quality of life in persons infected with HIV/AIDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148035
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated morphologic/metabolic changes and health-related quality of life in persons infected with HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated morphologic/metabolic changes and health-related quality of life in persons infected with HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Nicholas, Patrice Kenneally, RN, DNSc, MPH, ANP
P.I. Institution Name:Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Kenn M. Kirksey, RN, PhD, APRN, BC; Inge B. Corless, RN, PhD, FAAN; Jeanne Kemppainen, RN, PhD, CNS; Margaret E. Mueller, RN, MSN
Objective: The objective of this research was to identify the incidence and prevalence of body fat changes associated with HIV, and their correlation with health-related quality of life. Design: Cross-sectional, correlational, descriptive design Population, Sample, Setting: 165 HIV-infected persons in California, Massachusetts, and Texas. Variables: Health-related quality of life and lipodystrophic symptomatology in persons living with HIV/AIDS. Methods: Health-related quality of life was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 and the Living with HIV Scale. Symptoms were assessed using investigator-initiated open-ended questions. Findings: The mean age of the sample was 42.12 (SD + 8.29) and the mean number of years of formal education was 12.20 (SD + 2.45) years. Eighty percent (n=132) of the participants reported income as “barely enough” or “totally inadequate.” Approximately seventy-five percent (n=123) of the sample did not work for pay. On a scale of 0-100, the average score on quality of life variables was moderate to low, especially physical functioning, social functioning, and mental health. The mean score on the Living with HIV quality of life domains was moderate. Conclusions: There is a clear correlation between lipodystrophy symptom experiences and health-related quality of life in community-based samples of HIV-infected persons. It is reasonable to assume that work status/income may play an important role in illness representation and health outcomes appraisal. Implications: Further study is needed to define strategies that may be used by clients and their healthcare providers in order to diminish or eliminate HIV disease- and treatment-associated symptoms, and to enhance quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship between lipodystrophy-associated morphologic/metabolic changes and health-related quality of life in persons infected with HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148035-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated morphologic/metabolic changes and health-related quality of life in persons infected with HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nicholas, Patrice Kenneally, RN, DNSc, MPH, ANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pnicholas@mghihp.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kenn M. Kirksey, RN, PhD, APRN, BC; Inge B. Corless, RN, PhD, FAAN; Jeanne Kemppainen, RN, PhD, CNS; Margaret E. Mueller, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this research was to identify the incidence and prevalence of body fat changes associated with HIV, and their correlation with health-related quality of life. Design: Cross-sectional, correlational, descriptive design Population, Sample, Setting: 165 HIV-infected persons in California, Massachusetts, and Texas. Variables: Health-related quality of life and lipodystrophic symptomatology in persons living with HIV/AIDS. Methods: Health-related quality of life was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 and the Living with HIV Scale. Symptoms were assessed using investigator-initiated open-ended questions. Findings: The mean age of the sample was 42.12 (SD + 8.29) and the mean number of years of formal education was 12.20 (SD + 2.45) years. Eighty percent (n=132) of the participants reported income as &ldquo;barely enough&rdquo; or &ldquo;totally inadequate.&rdquo; Approximately seventy-five percent (n=123) of the sample did not work for pay. On a scale of 0-100, the average score on quality of life variables was moderate to low, especially physical functioning, social functioning, and mental health. The mean score on the Living with HIV quality of life domains was moderate. Conclusions: There is a clear correlation between lipodystrophy symptom experiences and health-related quality of life in community-based samples of HIV-infected persons. It is reasonable to assume that work status/income may play an important role in illness representation and health outcomes appraisal. Implications: Further study is needed to define strategies that may be used by clients and their healthcare providers in order to diminish or eliminate HIV disease- and treatment-associated symptoms, and to enhance quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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