The Relationships of Hardiness, Stress, and Health-Promotion Behaviors in Female Generic Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148037
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationships of Hardiness, Stress, and Health-Promotion Behaviors in Female Generic Nursing Students
Abstract:
The Relationships of Hardiness, Stress, and Health-Promotion Behaviors in Female Generic Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Nikou, Victoria Rizzo, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Pace University
Objective: to investigate the relationships among hardiness, stress, and health-promoting behaviors in healthy, future nurses. Design: exploratory correlational quantitative design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 271 female generic nursing students from 66 US baccalaureate and associate degree programs, ages 18 to 50+; members of the National Student Nurses Association, voluntarily solicited while attending the 2000 NSNA Convention. Concept or Variables Studied Together: : Pender’s health-promotion model, Lazarus’ stress, and Kobasa-Oulette’s hardiness model. Methods: Instrumentation included the Personal Views Survey(PVS), the Student Stress Inventory(SSI), the Health-Promotion Lifestyle Profile II(HPLPII) and demographic data form; analyses of means, medians, and standard deviations for age and instrument scores, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients, and multiple regression analyses. Findings: Hardiness was inversely related to stress and positively related to health-promoting behaviors; stress was negatively related to health-promoting behaviors; both were supported at the p<.001 level. Participants identified the nursing classroom as more stressful than the clinical. Conclusions: Hardiness was significantly correlated with health-promoting behaviors and inversely correlated with reported perceptions of stress. Stress was significantly correlated with limited health-promoting behaviors. Health-promoting behaviors were better in this population than in previously reported studies measuring nursing students and registered nurses. Implications: Since 81% of the participants indicated exposure to health-promotion principles in class nursing curriculum needs to continue to include these facts. The identification of a stress-resistant personality factor, hardiness, in students may also be viewed as a prediction of their stress-resistance as professional nurses. Due to the higher perceptions of stress in nursing classrooms, educators need to increase awareness of the need for stress-reduction programs and potential refinement of their classroom evaluation methods. Since nursing faculty was identified as good exemplars of health-promoting behaviors, educators need to be mindful of their role modeling behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationships of Hardiness, Stress, and Health-Promotion Behaviors in Female Generic Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148037-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationships of Hardiness, Stress, and Health-Promotion Behaviors in Female Generic Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nikou, Victoria Rizzo, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pace University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Phdrncs@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: to investigate the relationships among hardiness, stress, and health-promoting behaviors in healthy, future nurses. Design: exploratory correlational quantitative design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 271 female generic nursing students from 66 US baccalaureate and associate degree programs, ages 18 to 50+; members of the National Student Nurses Association, voluntarily solicited while attending the 2000 NSNA Convention. Concept or Variables Studied Together: : Pender&rsquo;s health-promotion model, Lazarus&rsquo; stress, and Kobasa-Oulette&rsquo;s hardiness model. Methods: Instrumentation included the Personal Views Survey(PVS), the Student Stress Inventory(SSI), the Health-Promotion Lifestyle Profile II(HPLPII) and demographic data form; analyses of means, medians, and standard deviations for age and instrument scores, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients, and multiple regression analyses. Findings: Hardiness was inversely related to stress and positively related to health-promoting behaviors; stress was negatively related to health-promoting behaviors; both were supported at the p&lt;.001 level. Participants identified the nursing classroom as more stressful than the clinical. Conclusions: Hardiness was significantly correlated with health-promoting behaviors and inversely correlated with reported perceptions of stress. Stress was significantly correlated with limited health-promoting behaviors. Health-promoting behaviors were better in this population than in previously reported studies measuring nursing students and registered nurses. Implications: Since 81% of the participants indicated exposure to health-promotion principles in class nursing curriculum needs to continue to include these facts. The identification of a stress-resistant personality factor, hardiness, in students may also be viewed as a prediction of their stress-resistance as professional nurses. Due to the higher perceptions of stress in nursing classrooms, educators need to increase awareness of the need for stress-reduction programs and potential refinement of their classroom evaluation methods. Since nursing faculty was identified as good exemplars of health-promoting behaviors, educators need to be mindful of their role modeling behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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