A Tailored, Computerized Physical Activity Intervention For Girls

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148058
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Tailored, Computerized Physical Activity Intervention For Girls
Abstract:
A Tailored, Computerized Physical Activity Intervention For Girls
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Robbins, Lorraine B., DNSc, RN, CFNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Assistant Research Scientist
Co-Authors:Nola J. Pender, PhD, RN, FAAN
Physical activity (PA) during adolescence decreases more drastically for girls than boys. The purpose of this pilot study, a 2-group pretest-posttest design, was to test the effectiveness of a computer-based interactive program to promote increased PA among sedentary girls (11 to 14 years) of low socioeconomic status and from diverse racial backgrounds. Girls were recruited from two middle schools in the Midwest. Each girl responded to questions about her PA as they were presented on a computer set up in each school’s wellness center. Seventy-seven girls were identified as either contemplators or preparers (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1984) and based on grade were assigned to either the intervention or control group. Questionnaires assessed variables from the Health Promotion Model (Pender, Murdaugh, & Parsons, 2002). Girls in the intervention group received tailored messages based upon personal answers to questions. Three and nine weeks after the initial visit, they completed computerized questionnaires to assess PA self-efficacy and barriers and received tailored feedback to increase PA self-efficacy. Each computer session was followed by a contracting session with a nurse practitioner to set PA goals. The intervention group received three prompt telephone calls. Tip sheets were sent to parents to enhance social support. Girls in both groups returned to the wellness center 12 weeks after initial contact to complete the final assessment questionnaires. Univariate and repeated measures ANOVA indicated no significant difference between intervention and control groups on stage of change, days of PA per week, and number of minutes of moderate and vigorous PA reported. However, a subgroup of girls in the intervention group (60%) benefited from the intervention (responders) and had a significantly higher level of PA at the posttest than the control group. Findings and implications for future research will be discussed. The study was supported by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Tailored, Computerized Physical Activity Intervention For Girlsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148058-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Tailored, Computerized Physical Activity Intervention For Girls</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robbins, Lorraine B., DNSc, RN, CFNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Research Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lrobbins@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nola J. Pender, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Physical activity (PA) during adolescence decreases more drastically for girls than boys. The purpose of this pilot study, a 2-group pretest-posttest design, was to test the effectiveness of a computer-based interactive program to promote increased PA among sedentary girls (11 to 14 years) of low socioeconomic status and from diverse racial backgrounds. Girls were recruited from two middle schools in the Midwest. Each girl responded to questions about her PA as they were presented on a computer set up in each school&rsquo;s wellness center. Seventy-seven girls were identified as either contemplators or preparers (Prochaska &amp; DiClemente, 1984) and based on grade were assigned to either the intervention or control group. Questionnaires assessed variables from the Health Promotion Model (Pender, Murdaugh, &amp; Parsons, 2002). Girls in the intervention group received tailored messages based upon personal answers to questions. Three and nine weeks after the initial visit, they completed computerized questionnaires to assess PA self-efficacy and barriers and received tailored feedback to increase PA self-efficacy. Each computer session was followed by a contracting session with a nurse practitioner to set PA goals. The intervention group received three prompt telephone calls. Tip sheets were sent to parents to enhance social support. Girls in both groups returned to the wellness center 12 weeks after initial contact to complete the final assessment questionnaires. Univariate and repeated measures ANOVA indicated no significant difference between intervention and control groups on stage of change, days of PA per week, and number of minutes of moderate and vigorous PA reported. However, a subgroup of girls in the intervention group (60%) benefited from the intervention (responders) and had a significantly higher level of PA at the posttest than the control group. Findings and implications for future research will be discussed. The study was supported by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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