2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148072
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Meaning of Work for Nursing Assistants in Long-Term Care
Abstract:
The Meaning of Work for Nursing Assistants in Long-Term Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Secrest, Janet, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Title:associate professor
Co-Authors:Daniel Iorio, BSN
OBJECTIVE: Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) play a major role in the care of the elderly in long-term facilities. As the life expectancy rises, we can expect a greater need for long-term care and, subsequently, a greater need for CNAs. Since most direct patient care in long-term facilities is given by CNAs it is important to understand their perspective. The work of the CNA is physically demanding, rarely praised, and poorly rewarded financially. Despite the difficult conditions of the job and tremendous turnover there are some CNAs who stay at their job. As nurses who supervise, and in many cases hire and train, the CNAs it is important to understand what keeps these vital members of the health care team at their job. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore what is meaningful to CNAs in long-term care facilities. DESIGN: This was a qualitative existential-phenomenological study. SAMPLE AND SETTING: The sample was purposive, consisting of 10 CNAs over 18 years of age, employed in a long term care facility, had worked at least one year in the facility, and were willing and able to articulate their experiences. CONCEPT: Meaning of work for CNAs. METHODS: A bracketing interview of the researcher was first conducted. In-depth interviews were analyzed in a part-to-whole dialectic within an interpretive research group. FINDINGS: CNAs experience their work in themes of family, pride, order, and stress. Themes are supported by direct quotes from participants. CONCLUSIONS/ IMPLICATIONS: With an aging population, the need for long-term care facilities grows. The responsibility for quality nursing care rests with nurses, yet nurses rarely provide direct care in long-term agencies. The results are examined in the context of King’s Theory of Mutual Goal attainment to help nurses foster an environment of compassionate care for CNAs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Meaning of Work for Nursing Assistants in Long-Term Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148072-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Meaning of Work for Nursing Assistants in Long-Term Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Secrest, Janet, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tennessee at Chattanooga</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">associate professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Janet-Secrest@utc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Daniel Iorio, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) play a major role in the care of the elderly in long-term facilities. As the life expectancy rises, we can expect a greater need for long-term care and, subsequently, a greater need for CNAs. Since most direct patient care in long-term facilities is given by CNAs it is important to understand their perspective. The work of the CNA is physically demanding, rarely praised, and poorly rewarded financially. Despite the difficult conditions of the job and tremendous turnover there are some CNAs who stay at their job. As nurses who supervise, and in many cases hire and train, the CNAs it is important to understand what keeps these vital members of the health care team at their job. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore what is meaningful to CNAs in long-term care facilities. DESIGN: This was a qualitative existential-phenomenological study. SAMPLE AND SETTING: The sample was purposive, consisting of 10 CNAs over 18 years of age, employed in a long term care facility, had worked at least one year in the facility, and were willing and able to articulate their experiences. CONCEPT: Meaning of work for CNAs. METHODS: A bracketing interview of the researcher was first conducted. In-depth interviews were analyzed in a part-to-whole dialectic within an interpretive research group. FINDINGS: CNAs experience their work in themes of family, pride, order, and stress. Themes are supported by direct quotes from participants. CONCLUSIONS/ IMPLICATIONS: With an aging population, the need for long-term care facilities grows. The responsibility for quality nursing care rests with nurses, yet nurses rarely provide direct care in long-term agencies. The results are examined in the context of King&rsquo;s Theory of Mutual Goal attainment to help nurses foster an environment of compassionate care for CNAs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:40:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:40:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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