2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148073
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Language on Hispanic's Pain Management Outcomes
Abstract:
Effect of Language on Hispanic's Pain Management Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Siders, Kathleen L., MSN, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:N/A
Title:Student
Evidence shows there is more under-treatment of pain among Hispanics than Caucasians. Language barriers often exist between Hispanic patients and health care workers. A Spanish pain assessment instrument, the Houston Pain Outcome Instrument (HPOI) was developed and psychometrically tested with 95 Hispanic patients. This secondary analysis was conducted to explore the differences in pain management outcomes amongst Hispanic patients based on language preference. The Shannon-Weaver model of communication provided the theoretical framework. Data from the pain experience of 95 Hispanic patients was collected in three Southwestern hospital settings. The Pain Management Index (PMI), as well as a new tool, the Patient Goal Index (PGI), was computed to compare both the appropriateness of analgesics prescribed and the achievement of the patient's pain management goal. No significant differences in outcomes of pain intensity, pain related interference, PGI, or PMI scores were revealed between those choosing the English or Spanish versions of the HPOI. Pre-op expectations of pain and post-op reports of pain intensity demonstrated only weak non-significant correlations. Although findings did not differentiate outcomes based on language preference, the inclusion of family in pain management and the impact of the health-care worker's behaviors were shown to be important in pain management for all Hispanic patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Language on Hispanic's Pain Management Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148073-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Language on Hispanic's Pain Management Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Siders, Kathleen L., MSN, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">N/A</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksiders@houston.rr.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Evidence shows there is more under-treatment of pain among Hispanics than Caucasians. Language barriers often exist between Hispanic patients and health care workers. A Spanish pain assessment instrument, the Houston Pain Outcome Instrument (HPOI) was developed and psychometrically tested with 95 Hispanic patients. This secondary analysis was conducted to explore the differences in pain management outcomes amongst Hispanic patients based on language preference. The Shannon-Weaver model of communication provided the theoretical framework. Data from the pain experience of 95 Hispanic patients was collected in three Southwestern hospital settings. The Pain Management Index (PMI), as well as a new tool, the Patient Goal Index (PGI), was computed to compare both the appropriateness of analgesics prescribed and the achievement of the patient's pain management goal. No significant differences in outcomes of pain intensity, pain related interference, PGI, or PMI scores were revealed between those choosing the English or Spanish versions of the HPOI. Pre-op expectations of pain and post-op reports of pain intensity demonstrated only weak non-significant correlations. Although findings did not differentiate outcomes based on language preference, the inclusion of family in pain management and the impact of the health-care worker's behaviors were shown to be important in pain management for all Hispanic patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:40:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:40:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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