Diversity of Membership on Non-Profit Community Health Organizations' Boards of Directors: Synergy or Chaos?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148103
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diversity of Membership on Non-Profit Community Health Organizations' Boards of Directors: Synergy or Chaos?
Abstract:
Diversity of Membership on Non-Profit Community Health Organizations' Boards of Directors: Synergy or Chaos?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Wendt, Deborah, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:College of Mount St. Joseph
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
Co-Authors:Marva Moore, MPH, RN
All non-profit hospitals, home health and social service agencies are ultimately governed by a board of directors/trustees composed of members who are elected, appointed, or self-selected. In the current health care environment, consumers of health care services, as well as health professionals and business executives are often recruited to serve as board members. Some non-profit community agencies supported by United States government funding mandate that 51% of board members must be community or neighborhood residents. Boards of directors/trustees may be composed of nurses, physicians, business executives, truck drivers, and waitresses who must learn to work together effectively as teams in order to preserve and promote the interests of the non-profit organization. Nurses frequently lead these community health agency boards with members from a variety of backgrounds. How can wide differences in educational background, ethnicity, and vocational experience be bridged? How can such differences produce a synergistic blend of unique perspectives rather than a chaotic mix of misunderstood viewpoints? Based on professional literature and many years of service on non-profit boards of directors/trustees, these nurse authors suggest five key strategies for creating or leading a non-profit board with diverse membership. These key strategies are listed below. 1. Create a motivating orientation program for new board members. 2. Run effective, informal meetings using an adapted form of Robert's Rules of Order. 3. Maintain a long term focus based on the mission and goals of the organization. 4. Mentor non-professionals in assuming leadership roles. 5. Evaluate board members annually. By using these five key strategies, nurse leaders will be able to create healthy professional relationships with, and between, board members. Diversity in board membership will lead to synergy rather than chaos.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiversity of Membership on Non-Profit Community Health Organizations' Boards of Directors: Synergy or Chaos?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148103-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Diversity of Membership on Non-Profit Community Health Organizations' Boards of Directors: Synergy or Chaos?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wendt, Deborah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">College of Mount St. Joseph</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">deborah_wendt@mail.msj.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marva Moore, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">All non-profit hospitals, home health and social service agencies are ultimately governed by a board of directors/trustees composed of members who are elected, appointed, or self-selected. In the current health care environment, consumers of health care services, as well as health professionals and business executives are often recruited to serve as board members. Some non-profit community agencies supported by United States government funding mandate that 51% of board members must be community or neighborhood residents. Boards of directors/trustees may be composed of nurses, physicians, business executives, truck drivers, and waitresses who must learn to work together effectively as teams in order to preserve and promote the interests of the non-profit organization. Nurses frequently lead these community health agency boards with members from a variety of backgrounds. How can wide differences in educational background, ethnicity, and vocational experience be bridged? How can such differences produce a synergistic blend of unique perspectives rather than a chaotic mix of misunderstood viewpoints? Based on professional literature and many years of service on non-profit boards of directors/trustees, these nurse authors suggest five key strategies for creating or leading a non-profit board with diverse membership. These key strategies are listed below. 1. Create a motivating orientation program for new board members. 2. Run effective, informal meetings using an adapted form of Robert's Rules of Order. 3. Maintain a long term focus based on the mission and goals of the organization. 4. Mentor non-professionals in assuming leadership roles. 5. Evaluate board members annually. By using these five key strategies, nurse leaders will be able to create healthy professional relationships with, and between, board members. Diversity in board membership will lead to synergy rather than chaos.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:40:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:40:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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