2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148123
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Beyond Words: Using Art to Convey Experiences With the Homeless
Abstract:
Beyond Words: Using Art to Convey Experiences With the Homeless
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Allen, Carol B., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Written and verbal reflective exercises such as journal writing have been shown to refine students' critical thinking in a variety of practice experiences (Croke, 2004; Kuiper, 2005; Pfund, Dawson, Francis & Rees, 2004; Williams & Wessel, 2002). Reflection through the use of non verbal representations is less well described in the literature. Wagner (1998) asked students to reflect on their practice using story, poetry, and visual artistic expressions. She found that sharing their stories and their art products moved students to deeper levels of reflection about their experiences and increased their awareness of the affective components. The presenter has taught students in a combined mental health and community health clinical experience caring for homeless and low income clients in shelters, single room occupancy apartments, parks, and drop in centers for several years. At the end of the semester when students tried to convey the often profound changes in attitudes, values, and skills verbally that occurred as a result of this experience, it was clear that words were inadequate to express the entire scope of their experiences. For the past six semesters, the presenter has asked students to create art forms in response to a structured reflection on their experiences. These art forms are presented at their final clinical conference accompanied by a narrative explanation of the significance of the representation and its relationship to significant changes in the individual student's attitudes, values, skills, and beliefs. This presentation will describe and demonstrate examples of the students' work in a wide variety of media, including collage, drawing, photography, needlework, sculpture, music, video, and poetry. Significant themes that have been identified in these student works from semester to semester will also be shared. Suggestions for incorporating this approach to other experiences in a variety of settings will be shared.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeyond Words: Using Art to Convey Experiences With the Homelessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148123-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Beyond Words: Using Art to Convey Experiences With the Homeless</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Allen, Carol B., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">taotaomona@msn.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Written and verbal reflective exercises such as journal writing have been shown to refine students' critical thinking in a variety of practice experiences (Croke, 2004; Kuiper, 2005; Pfund, Dawson, Francis &amp; Rees, 2004; Williams &amp; Wessel, 2002). Reflection through the use of non verbal representations is less well described in the literature. Wagner (1998) asked students to reflect on their practice using story, poetry, and visual artistic expressions. She found that sharing their stories and their art products moved students to deeper levels of reflection about their experiences and increased their awareness of the affective components. The presenter has taught students in a combined mental health and community health clinical experience caring for homeless and low income clients in shelters, single room occupancy apartments, parks, and drop in centers for several years. At the end of the semester when students tried to convey the often profound changes in attitudes, values, and skills verbally that occurred as a result of this experience, it was clear that words were inadequate to express the entire scope of their experiences. For the past six semesters, the presenter has asked students to create art forms in response to a structured reflection on their experiences. These art forms are presented at their final clinical conference accompanied by a narrative explanation of the significance of the representation and its relationship to significant changes in the individual student's attitudes, values, skills, and beliefs. This presentation will describe and demonstrate examples of the students' work in a wide variety of media, including collage, drawing, photography, needlework, sculpture, music, video, and poetry. Significant themes that have been identified in these student works from semester to semester will also be shared. Suggestions for incorporating this approach to other experiences in a variety of settings will be shared.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:40:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:40:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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