2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148127
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Marital Transactions of Chronic Headache Sufferers
Abstract:
Marital Transactions of Chronic Headache Sufferers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Basolo-Kunzer, Mary, DNSc, RN, CS
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University School of Nursing South Bend
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Seymour Diamond, MD; Fred Frietag, MD
The purpose of this study was to test Minuchin, Rosman, and Baker's Family Systems Theory (l978) with an adult chronic headache population that had not responded to conventional medical treatment prescribed by their primary care physicians. One hundred and twenty-one chronic headache sufferers were assessed for headache pain on their initial appointment at a specialty headache clinic, and again post ?treatment and at 3 months follow-up using the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The chronic headache sufferers and their spouses were assessed for marital cohesion, adaptability, and conflict at these same points in time using the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale IV and the Dyadic Adjustment Scale. At pretreatment, 15% of the couples (N=17) were balanced and functional in relating to one another, 56% (N=66) were predominately rigid and moderately dysfunctional in relating to one another, and 29% (N=34) were rigid, chaotic, conflictual, and dysfunctional in relating to one another. Chronic headache sufferers perceived their marital transactions as more balanced than their spouses. Changes in rigidity and chaos were positively correlated with changes in pain at post-treatment. In conclusion, thirty-four adult chronic headache sufferers who presented at a specialty headache clinic and their spouses were in conflict with one another and related in rigid and chaotic ways. Their transactional patterns were similar to those seen by Minuchin in families with children who had uncontrollable diabetes, asthma, abdominal pain, and anorexia. The adult chronic headache sufferers' transactional patterns differed from Minuchin's families being chaotic verses enmeshed and over-protective. Nurses who treat chronic headache sufferers should be aware that some chronic headache sufferers may be experiencing marital conflict at the time of their initial appointment for pain management treatment. Nurses should assess for marital conflict in chronic headache sufferers and their spouses at the beginning of pain management treatment for chronic headaches.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMarital Transactions of Chronic Headache Sufferersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148127-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Marital Transactions of Chronic Headache Sufferers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Basolo-Kunzer, Mary, DNSc, RN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University School of Nursing South Bend</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mbasolo@iusb.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Seymour Diamond, MD; Fred Frietag, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to test Minuchin, Rosman, and Baker's Family Systems Theory (l978) with an adult chronic headache population that had not responded to conventional medical treatment prescribed by their primary care physicians. One hundred and twenty-one chronic headache sufferers were assessed for headache pain on their initial appointment at a specialty headache clinic, and again post ?treatment and at 3 months follow-up using the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The chronic headache sufferers and their spouses were assessed for marital cohesion, adaptability, and conflict at these same points in time using the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale IV and the Dyadic Adjustment Scale. At pretreatment, 15% of the couples (N=17) were balanced and functional in relating to one another, 56% (N=66) were predominately rigid and moderately dysfunctional in relating to one another, and 29% (N=34) were rigid, chaotic, conflictual, and dysfunctional in relating to one another. Chronic headache sufferers perceived their marital transactions as more balanced than their spouses. Changes in rigidity and chaos were positively correlated with changes in pain at post-treatment. In conclusion, thirty-four adult chronic headache sufferers who presented at a specialty headache clinic and their spouses were in conflict with one another and related in rigid and chaotic ways. Their transactional patterns were similar to those seen by Minuchin in families with children who had uncontrollable diabetes, asthma, abdominal pain, and anorexia. The adult chronic headache sufferers' transactional patterns differed from Minuchin's families being chaotic verses enmeshed and over-protective. Nurses who treat chronic headache sufferers should be aware that some chronic headache sufferers may be experiencing marital conflict at the time of their initial appointment for pain management treatment. Nurses should assess for marital conflict in chronic headache sufferers and their spouses at the beginning of pain management treatment for chronic headaches.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:40:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:40:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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