2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148131
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women With and Without a Family History: Different Approaches
Abstract:
Women With and Without a Family History: Different Approaches
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Boehmke, Marcia M., DNS, RN, ANPc
P.I. Institution Name:University at Buffalo
Title:Research Assistant Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to investigate the attitudes and lived-experience among women recently diagnosed with breast cancer with and without a family history. Design: Hermeneutic phenomenology was the interpretive approach used. Population, Sample, Setting: A purposive sampling of 30 women, newly diagnosed with breast cancer, were recruited from a breast center in Buffalo, New York. Variables/Concepts Studied: (1.) What are the common attitudes/experiences of women diagnosed with breast cancer who have relatives with breast cancer? (2.) Are these attitudes/experiences different from those with no family history of breast cancer? Methods: Hermeneutic phenomenology, that emphasizes the lived-experience holistically, guided interviews of women who were asked to tell their story about their breast cancer diagnosis. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and data analysis consisted of thematic analysis of the narratives. Findings: Three themes emerged: (1.) Women with a family history of breast cancer had a more optimistic/hopeful view of the diagnosis of breast cancer, focusing on survivorship; (2.) Women with a family history of breast cancer approached the diagnosis with a ?when, not if? approach; (3.) Women with no family history were shocked by the diagnosis and experienced a precipitous change in life from health to illness overnight. Conclusions: Women newly diagnosed with breast cancer who had a family history dealt better with the diagnosis and dealt with the diagnosis from a survivorship perspective. Women with no family history were unsuspecting and had a difficult life transition that affected not only the symptom experience but their quality of life. Implications: As women are diagnosed with breast cancer, oncology nurses need to be aware of the intense emotions experienced particularly in those women with no family history of breast cancer. A woman's view/perception of breast cancer can affect their experiences and response to symptoms encountered.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen With and Without a Family History: Different Approachesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148131-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women With and Without a Family History: Different Approaches</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Boehmke, Marcia M., DNS, RN, ANPc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University at Buffalo</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">boehmke@buffalo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to investigate the attitudes and lived-experience among women recently diagnosed with breast cancer with and without a family history. Design: Hermeneutic phenomenology was the interpretive approach used. Population, Sample, Setting: A purposive sampling of 30 women, newly diagnosed with breast cancer, were recruited from a breast center in Buffalo, New York. Variables/Concepts Studied: (1.) What are the common attitudes/experiences of women diagnosed with breast cancer who have relatives with breast cancer? (2.) Are these attitudes/experiences different from those with no family history of breast cancer? Methods: Hermeneutic phenomenology, that emphasizes the lived-experience holistically, guided interviews of women who were asked to tell their story about their breast cancer diagnosis. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and data analysis consisted of thematic analysis of the narratives. Findings: Three themes emerged: (1.) Women with a family history of breast cancer had a more optimistic/hopeful view of the diagnosis of breast cancer, focusing on survivorship; (2.) Women with a family history of breast cancer approached the diagnosis with a ?when, not if? approach; (3.) Women with no family history were shocked by the diagnosis and experienced a precipitous change in life from health to illness overnight. Conclusions: Women newly diagnosed with breast cancer who had a family history dealt better with the diagnosis and dealt with the diagnosis from a survivorship perspective. Women with no family history were unsuspecting and had a difficult life transition that affected not only the symptom experience but their quality of life. Implications: As women are diagnosed with breast cancer, oncology nurses need to be aware of the intense emotions experienced particularly in those women with no family history of breast cancer. A woman's view/perception of breast cancer can affect their experiences and response to symptoms encountered.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:40:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:40:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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