Family-Witnessed Resuscitation: An Exploration of Nurses' Decision-Making

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148132
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family-Witnessed Resuscitation: An Exploration of Nurses' Decision-Making
Abstract:
Family-Witnessed Resuscitation: An Exploration of Nurses' Decision-Making
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bousman, Denise, BSN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Ball Memorial Hospital
Title:Critical Care Educator
Co-Authors:Alexis Neal, RN, MA; Renee Samples Twibell, DNS, RN; Susan Beatty, RN; Sherry Harrigan, RN, BS, CCRN, BC, CVNI; Doreen Johnson, RN, BS, MA, CHE; Cheryl Riwitis, BSN, RN, CEN; Debra Siela, DNSc, CCRN, CCNS, APRN, BC, RRT; Joe Wheatley, BSN, CRRN
Nurses play key decision-making roles regarding the presence of families at the bedside of patients undergoing resuscitation. However, little is known about the factors that influence nurses' decisions to invite families to be present. Prior research, which has focused primarily on nurses who work in critical care settings, reveals nurses' conflicting perspectives about family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR). The purpose of this study was to examine correlates of nurses' decisions to facilitate FWR. Specifically, the study examined the relationships among nurses' perceptions of risk, benefit, self-efficacy, and self-report of the frequency with which nurses invited families to be present during resuscitation. Bandura's (1978) theory of self-efficacy and Hammond's (1988) Cognitive Continuum theory of decision-making guided this exploratory study. The sample (n=109) included nurses from a variety of inpatient units who completed the Family Presence Self-Efficacy Scale and the Family Presence Perceptions Scale. Two hypotheses were supported. Nurses who had invited family presence more than five times reported greater self-efficacy, greater perceived benefit and less perceived risk than nurses who had never invited families to be present during resuscitation (p The findings suggest that nurses' decisions to facilitate FWR are correlated with nurses' perceived risk and benefit of FWR and with nurses' confidence that they can care well for patients and families during resuscitation. Educators, managers and researchers can design and test approaches for building nurses' confidence in FWR skills and can encourage nurses to reflect on perceptions that influence decision-making.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily-Witnessed Resuscitation: An Exploration of Nurses' Decision-Makingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148132-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family-Witnessed Resuscitation: An Exploration of Nurses' Decision-Making</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bousman, Denise, BSN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ball Memorial Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Critical Care Educator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dbousman@chsmail.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Alexis Neal, RN, MA; Renee Samples Twibell, DNS, RN; Susan Beatty, RN; Sherry Harrigan, RN, BS, CCRN, BC, CVNI; Doreen Johnson, RN, BS, MA, CHE; Cheryl Riwitis, BSN, RN, CEN; Debra Siela, DNSc, CCRN, CCNS, APRN, BC, RRT; Joe Wheatley, BSN, CRRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses play key decision-making roles regarding the presence of families at the bedside of patients undergoing resuscitation. However, little is known about the factors that influence nurses' decisions to invite families to be present. Prior research, which has focused primarily on nurses who work in critical care settings, reveals nurses' conflicting perspectives about family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR). The purpose of this study was to examine correlates of nurses' decisions to facilitate FWR. Specifically, the study examined the relationships among nurses' perceptions of risk, benefit, self-efficacy, and self-report of the frequency with which nurses invited families to be present during resuscitation. Bandura's (1978) theory of self-efficacy and Hammond's (1988) Cognitive Continuum theory of decision-making guided this exploratory study. The sample (n=109) included nurses from a variety of inpatient units who completed the Family Presence Self-Efficacy Scale and the Family Presence Perceptions Scale. Two hypotheses were supported. Nurses who had invited family presence more than five times reported greater self-efficacy, greater perceived benefit and less perceived risk than nurses who had never invited families to be present during resuscitation (p The findings suggest that nurses' decisions to facilitate FWR are correlated with nurses' perceived risk and benefit of FWR and with nurses' confidence that they can care well for patients and families during resuscitation. Educators, managers and researchers can design and test approaches for building nurses' confidence in FWR skills and can encourage nurses to reflect on perceptions that influence decision-making.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:40:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:40:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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