Can You Do the Math? Comparison of Mathematic Competencies of Associate and Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148136
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Can You Do the Math? Comparison of Mathematic Competencies of Associate and Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Students
Abstract:
Can You Do the Math? Comparison of Mathematic Competencies of Associate and Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Brown, Daryle, EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Western Connecticut State University
Title:Associate Professor Department of Nursing
Many nursing students lack computational mathematic ability. A computational mathematics test was administered to more than 850 AD students nationwide (1985). The same test was administered to 230 BSN students in the NE region of the US in 1987, and 294 BSN students in 2003. The purposes of the studies were to break down the process of medication administration into its components, identify weak links and remediate where appropriate; compare the computational mathematic abilities of AD and BSN students; and, identify if baccalaureate nursing students' computational mathematic abilities had changed over time. Participants were beginning nursing students from accredited nursing programs. A proportional stratified random sampling technique was used to enhance representativeness of the AD sample (1985). The number of baccalaureate schools from the NE region of the US (1987, 2003) was obtained to equal the number of AD programs that had participated from that region in the original study. Students were administered an adaptation of the Computational Placement Test. The CPT is concerned primarily with basic arithmetic operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percents. The study instrument was administered to students at participating schools by the chairperson of the nursing program or designee. A consent form, returned under separate cover, was included with each study instrument. A signed consent form was needed for the study instrument to be included in the study. Statistical analysis used the mean: of the study instrument in its entirety; and, of each individual question (item). The mean student score on the study instrument was 75% for AD students; 76.3%,BSN students (1987); and, 77%, BSN students (2003). Individual items with less than a 70% average correct student response included adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing fractions, decimals and percents. The items were similar for both AD and BSN students and have not changed over time.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCan You Do the Math? Comparison of Mathematic Competencies of Associate and Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148136-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Can You Do the Math? Comparison of Mathematic Competencies of Associate and Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brown, Daryle, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Western Connecticut State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">BrownDL@wcsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Many nursing students lack computational mathematic ability. A computational mathematics test was administered to more than 850 AD students nationwide (1985). The same test was administered to 230 BSN students in the NE region of the US in 1987, and 294 BSN students in 2003. The purposes of the studies were to break down the process of medication administration into its components, identify weak links and remediate where appropriate; compare the computational mathematic abilities of AD and BSN students; and, identify if baccalaureate nursing students' computational mathematic abilities had changed over time. Participants were beginning nursing students from accredited nursing programs. A proportional stratified random sampling technique was used to enhance representativeness of the AD sample (1985). The number of baccalaureate schools from the NE region of the US (1987, 2003) was obtained to equal the number of AD programs that had participated from that region in the original study. Students were administered an adaptation of the Computational Placement Test. The CPT is concerned primarily with basic arithmetic operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percents. The study instrument was administered to students at participating schools by the chairperson of the nursing program or designee. A consent form, returned under separate cover, was included with each study instrument. A signed consent form was needed for the study instrument to be included in the study. Statistical analysis used the mean: of the study instrument in its entirety; and, of each individual question (item). The mean student score on the study instrument was 75% for AD students; 76.3%,BSN students (1987); and, 77%, BSN students (2003). Individual items with less than a 70% average correct student response included adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing fractions, decimals and percents. The items were similar for both AD and BSN students and have not changed over time.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:40:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:40:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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