Birth Weight and Pre-Natal Care Among Impoverished Childbearing Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148147
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Birth Weight and Pre-Natal Care Among Impoverished Childbearing Women
Abstract:
Birth Weight and Pre-Natal Care Among Impoverished Childbearing Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Berry, Linda M., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Eastern Michigan University
Title:Associate professor
Birth weight is an important outcome indicator of childbearing and it is a consideration in all pre-natal care programs. Lower birth weights are linked to infant morbidity and mortality, yet efforts to improve birth weight and attendance for pre-natal care are impeded by lack of information about both birth weight and pre-natal care. This study used a predictive correlational design to examine the effects of perceived stress, sense of belonging, and life style behaviors in predicting birth weight and attendance for pre-natal care. A structured interview format was used to survey 100 impoverished childbearing women who were more than 36 weeks pregnant and at least 20 years of age. The women were approached and invited to participate while attending one of two hospital-based pre-natal clinics in south east Michigan. Data were subjected to bivariate correlations and regression analyses, and the findings indicate that only the variable income was able to predict birth weight. Use of pre-natal care was predicted by psychosocial factors, such as sense of belonging and living with a significant other. Predictors of life style behaviors were also dependent on psychosocial factors. Economic factors predicted both the level of perceived stress and the sense of belonging of the women. The findings are important for the early identification of childbearing women who are at risk and suggests that a relationship of psychosocial and economic factors impact on healthy life style behaviors among impoverished childbearing women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBirth Weight and Pre-Natal Care Among Impoverished Childbearing Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148147-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Birth Weight and Pre-Natal Care Among Impoverished Childbearing Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Berry, Linda M., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Eastern Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Linda.Berry@emich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Birth weight is an important outcome indicator of childbearing and it is a consideration in all pre-natal care programs. Lower birth weights are linked to infant morbidity and mortality, yet efforts to improve birth weight and attendance for pre-natal care are impeded by lack of information about both birth weight and pre-natal care. This study used a predictive correlational design to examine the effects of perceived stress, sense of belonging, and life style behaviors in predicting birth weight and attendance for pre-natal care. A structured interview format was used to survey 100 impoverished childbearing women who were more than 36 weeks pregnant and at least 20 years of age. The women were approached and invited to participate while attending one of two hospital-based pre-natal clinics in south east Michigan. Data were subjected to bivariate correlations and regression analyses, and the findings indicate that only the variable income was able to predict birth weight. Use of pre-natal care was predicted by psychosocial factors, such as sense of belonging and living with a significant other. Predictors of life style behaviors were also dependent on psychosocial factors. Economic factors predicted both the level of perceived stress and the sense of belonging of the women. The findings are important for the early identification of childbearing women who are at risk and suggests that a relationship of psychosocial and economic factors impact on healthy life style behaviors among impoverished childbearing women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:41:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:41:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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