2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148153
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Era of the "New Genetics": Are We Prepared?
Abstract:
The Era of the "New Genetics": Are We Prepared?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Bottorff, Joan L., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of British Columbia
Title:Professor
Objectives: To describe the knowledge, professional involvement and confidence of Canadian nurses in providing genetic services for adult onset hereditary disease (AOHD), and to explore the perceived usefulness and preferred formats of continuing education programs related to genetic testing and AOHD. Design: Descriptive survey Population, sample, setting: A random sample of 1,425 nurses was drawn from the membership list of the Canadian Nurses Association. Of this sample, 196 were excluded because they were no longer practicing nurses or because of incorrect addresses. Complete questionnaires were received for 975 nurses, resulting in a response rate of 79%. Methods: A survey questionnaire was developed and pilot tested. The survey procedure included a postcard reminder one week following the mail-out of the first questionnaire. Four weeks later non responders received a second copy of the questionnaire, followed by a post-card reminder one week later. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Findings: A significant proportion nurses reported receiving no formal education in genetics and most had not participated in seminars or workshops in genetics during the past three years. Important knowledge gaps were observed. The majority of respondents in clinical practice reported that during the previous year they had at least some patients for whom the issue of AOHD had been discussed. Although nurses did not report a high level of confidence with providing services related to genetics, they believed they had a role to play in this area. Interest in AOHD was moderately high. Nurses identified topics of most interest to them and their preferences for different forms of continuing education. Conclusions: The results raise questions about the preparedness of nurses to address genetic issues related to AOHD. There is an urgent need to expand educational opportunities addressing AOHD for practicing clinicians as well as students in professional training.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Era of the "New Genetics": Are We Prepared?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148153-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Era of the &quot;New Genetics&quot;: Are We Prepared?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bottorff, Joan L., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of British Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Bottorff@nursing.ubc.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: To describe the knowledge, professional involvement and confidence of Canadian nurses in providing genetic services for adult onset hereditary disease (AOHD), and to explore the perceived usefulness and preferred formats of continuing education programs related to genetic testing and AOHD. Design: Descriptive survey Population, sample, setting: A random sample of 1,425 nurses was drawn from the membership list of the Canadian Nurses Association. Of this sample, 196 were excluded because they were no longer practicing nurses or because of incorrect addresses. Complete questionnaires were received for 975 nurses, resulting in a response rate of 79%. Methods: A survey questionnaire was developed and pilot tested. The survey procedure included a postcard reminder one week following the mail-out of the first questionnaire. Four weeks later non responders received a second copy of the questionnaire, followed by a post-card reminder one week later. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Findings: A significant proportion nurses reported receiving no formal education in genetics and most had not participated in seminars or workshops in genetics during the past three years. Important knowledge gaps were observed. The majority of respondents in clinical practice reported that during the previous year they had at least some patients for whom the issue of AOHD had been discussed. Although nurses did not report a high level of confidence with providing services related to genetics, they believed they had a role to play in this area. Interest in AOHD was moderately high. Nurses identified topics of most interest to them and their preferences for different forms of continuing education. Conclusions: The results raise questions about the preparedness of nurses to address genetic issues related to AOHD. There is an urgent need to expand educational opportunities addressing AOHD for practicing clinicians as well as students in professional training.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:41:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:41:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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