2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148154
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Archaeological Analysis of Caring
Abstract:
An Archaeological Analysis of Caring
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Bourgeois, Sharon R., RN, BA, MA, MEd, FCN, FRCNA
P.I. Institution Name:University Western Sydney
Title:Clinical Director
Background: During my operating theatre nursing practice, I experienced frustration when some nurses outside of my practice arena voiced their lack of understanding about caring in an operating theatre context. These colleagues' views were that because patients were not ‘awake’ then how could I say that I was caring for them and not merely acting as a technician. Objective: In order to understand the above phenomenon, I have undertaken an archaeological analysis of caring. This approach is based on the work of Michel Foucault (1972) and has involved the systematic excavation of caring statements as presented in the nursing literature, to identify the statements, discourse and discursive formation of caring. That is, an archeological analysis has been undertaken. Findings: Arising from this analysis, three distinct discourses — ‘Being, Doing and Knowing of Caring’ — within An Archive of Caring, can be identified and described. Conclusions: This presentation gives emphasis to the discourses ‘Being, Doing and Knowing of Caring’. The archaeological excavation of caring will be firstly delineated to situate the research, followed by a discussion of the discourses. The tools developed to excavate the knowledge of caring will be incorporated into the discussion as will the application of the findings from this study to nursing knowledge development and nursing practice. Implications: This research contributes to our understanding of caring as a phenomenon that is discussed and researched worldwide. Recognizing where nurses are situated within these discourses assists us to understand issues that are relevant to nurses and their practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Archaeological Analysis of Caringen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148154-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Archaeological Analysis of Caring</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bourgeois, Sharon R., RN, BA, MA, MEd, FCN, FRCNA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University Western Sydney</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">s.bourgeois@uws.edu.au</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: During my operating theatre nursing practice, I experienced frustration when some nurses outside of my practice arena voiced their lack of understanding about caring in an operating theatre context. These colleagues' views were that because patients were not &lsquo;awake&rsquo; then how could I say that I was caring for them and not merely acting as a technician. Objective: In order to understand the above phenomenon, I have undertaken an archaeological analysis of caring. This approach is based on the work of Michel Foucault (1972) and has involved the systematic excavation of caring statements as presented in the nursing literature, to identify the statements, discourse and discursive formation of caring. That is, an archeological analysis has been undertaken. Findings: Arising from this analysis, three distinct discourses &mdash; &lsquo;Being, Doing and Knowing of Caring&rsquo; &mdash; within An Archive of Caring, can be identified and described. Conclusions: This presentation gives emphasis to the discourses &lsquo;Being, Doing and Knowing of Caring&rsquo;. The archaeological excavation of caring will be firstly delineated to situate the research, followed by a discussion of the discourses. The tools developed to excavate the knowledge of caring will be incorporated into the discussion as will the application of the findings from this study to nursing knowledge development and nursing practice. Implications: This research contributes to our understanding of caring as a phenomenon that is discussed and researched worldwide. Recognizing where nurses are situated within these discourses assists us to understand issues that are relevant to nurses and their practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:41:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:41:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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