Shipboard Nursing on Aircraft Carriers: The Lived Experience of Twelve Navy Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148175
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Shipboard Nursing on Aircraft Carriers: The Lived Experience of Twelve Navy Nurses
Abstract:
Shipboard Nursing on Aircraft Carriers: The Lived Experience of Twelve Navy Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Cox, Catherine Wilson, RN, PhD, CCRN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Georgetown University
Title:Assistant Professor
Overview: The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experience of shipboard nursing on aircraft carriers. Using the principles of phenomenology, 12 Navy nurses (six male, six female) previously stationed aboard aircraft carriers were interviewed to explore their experiences as ships' nurses. The participants were asked: "What was your experience as a nurse on an aircraft carrier?" Husserlian phenomenology provided the theoretical framework for this study and Streubert's methodological approach was chosen to analyze the phenomena. Data organization was aided through the use of the computer program entitled NVivo. Shipboard nursing was best described by the following essences: experiencing the best but toughest job the Navy has to offer its nurses; ensuring operational readiness; being one-of-one; operating constantly in an environment of uncertainty; having two families; and making the job better for the next generation. The findings of this study have implications for operational readiness and have given a public voice to this extraordinary experience of military nursing. Acknowledgements: This study was sponsored by the Department of Defense Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP) at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) - (Grant# N00-002). Primary IRB approval was obtained from the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, MD (CIP Study #B00-020). The views expressed in this abstract are the author's and do not reflect the official policy or position, nor should any official endorsement be inferred by, or of the TSNRP, Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, nor the U.S. Government.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleShipboard Nursing on Aircraft Carriers: The Lived Experience of Twelve Navy Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148175-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Shipboard Nursing on Aircraft Carriers: The Lived Experience of Twelve Navy Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cox, Catherine Wilson, RN, PhD, CCRN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgetown University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">coxk@allkids.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Overview: The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experience of shipboard nursing on aircraft carriers. Using the principles of phenomenology, 12 Navy nurses (six male, six female) previously stationed aboard aircraft carriers were interviewed to explore their experiences as ships' nurses. The participants were asked: &quot;What was your experience as a nurse on an aircraft carrier?&quot; Husserlian phenomenology provided the theoretical framework for this study and Streubert's methodological approach was chosen to analyze the phenomena. Data organization was aided through the use of the computer program entitled NVivo. Shipboard nursing was best described by the following essences: experiencing the best but toughest job the Navy has to offer its nurses; ensuring operational readiness; being one-of-one; operating constantly in an environment of uncertainty; having two families; and making the job better for the next generation. The findings of this study have implications for operational readiness and have given a public voice to this extraordinary experience of military nursing. Acknowledgements: This study was sponsored by the Department of Defense Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP) at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) - (Grant# N00-002). Primary IRB approval was obtained from the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, MD (CIP Study #B00-020). The views expressed in this abstract are the author's and do not reflect the official policy or position, nor should any official endorsement be inferred by, or of the TSNRP, Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, nor the U.S. Government.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:41:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:41:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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