Planning of Pregnancy and Duration of Breastfeeding in New Zealand

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148187
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Planning of Pregnancy and Duration of Breastfeeding in New Zealand
Abstract:
Planning of Pregnancy and Duration of Breastfeeding in New Zealand
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Edelstein, Joan, MSN, DrPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:San Jose State University
Title:Professor of Maternity Nursing Emerita
Co-Authors:Mary Anne Levine, RN, SCM, MSN; Maralyn Foureur, RGOM, RM, BA, PhD
Ojective/Design: This exploratory study was designed to determine the relationship between planning of pregnancy and duration of exclusive breastfeeding in women who had chosen to breastfeed their infants. Study population sample, setting, and methods: A convenience sample of 102 primiparous women, who had chosen to breastfeed, responded to a two part survey on the postnatal ward of a tertiary referral hospital in New Zealand: Part I self administered on the day of discharge from hospital and Part II completed during a telephone interview at six weeks postpartum. One hundred women completed the study. Findings: No relationship was found between whether the pregnancy was planned and the duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Of the 100 women breastfeeding on discharge from hospital, 66 (65%) were exclusively breastfeeding at six weeks and 34 (35%) were artificially feeding their infants. Women whose education was greater than 12th grade were significantly more likely to exclusively breastfeed at six weeks postpartum than women whose education was less than or equal to the12th grade (p = 0.02). As the income level of the women increased, the incidence of pregnancy planning also increased Conclusions and Implications: Previous studies in the USA have found a relationship between planning of pregnancy and the decision to breastfeed. Once the decision to breastfeed was made, further relationship between planning of pregnancy and exclusive breastfeeding was not found in this group of breastfeeding mothers in one New Zealand setting. This may be due to many factors.The relationship between level of education and exclusive breastfeeding at six weeks is not well recognised. Further research to determine the relationship between planning of pregnancy and the decision to breastfeed be replicated in other populations is recommended. Additional research should address increased breastfeeding support for women at the lower levels of education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePlanning of Pregnancy and Duration of Breastfeeding in New Zealanden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148187-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Planning of Pregnancy and Duration of Breastfeeding in New Zealand</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Edelstein, Joan, MSN, DrPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Jose State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor of Maternity Nursing Emerita</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joanmed@pacbell.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Anne Levine, RN, SCM, MSN; Maralyn Foureur, RGOM, RM, BA, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Ojective/Design: This exploratory study was designed to determine the relationship between planning of pregnancy and duration of exclusive breastfeeding in women who had chosen to breastfeed their infants. Study population sample, setting, and methods: A convenience sample of 102 primiparous women, who had chosen to breastfeed, responded to a two part survey on the postnatal ward of a tertiary referral hospital in New Zealand: Part I self administered on the day of discharge from hospital and Part II completed during a telephone interview at six weeks postpartum. One hundred women completed the study. Findings: No relationship was found between whether the pregnancy was planned and the duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Of the 100 women breastfeeding on discharge from hospital, 66 (65%) were exclusively breastfeeding at six weeks and 34 (35%) were artificially feeding their infants. Women whose education was greater than 12th grade were significantly more likely to exclusively breastfeed at six weeks postpartum than women whose education was less than or equal to the12th grade (p = 0.02). As the income level of the women increased, the incidence of pregnancy planning also increased Conclusions and Implications: Previous studies in the USA have found a relationship between planning of pregnancy and the decision to breastfeed. Once the decision to breastfeed was made, further relationship between planning of pregnancy and exclusive breastfeeding was not found in this group of breastfeeding mothers in one New Zealand setting. This may be due to many factors.The relationship between level of education and exclusive breastfeeding at six weeks is not well recognised. Further research to determine the relationship between planning of pregnancy and the decision to breastfeed be replicated in other populations is recommended. Additional research should address increased breastfeeding support for women at the lower levels of education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:41:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:41:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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