Education Levels and Self-Perception of Leadership Styles of Long-Term Care Nursing Administrators/Directors of Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148194
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Education Levels and Self-Perception of Leadership Styles of Long-Term Care Nursing Administrators/Directors of Nursing
Abstract:
Education Levels and Self-Perception of Leadership Styles of Long-Term Care Nursing Administrators/Directors of Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Foote, Dorothy Gargis, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alabama in Huntsville
Title:Assistant Professor
The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the self-perceived leadership styles of nursing administrators employed in long-term care facilities and to study the relationship between educational level, nursing institutional characteristics, and the self-perceived leadership styles. Using the Hersey and Blanchard (1979, 2000) LEAD-Self instrument, data was collected on the self-perceived primary and secondary leadership styles, style range, and style adaptability of 35 randomly selected, participating nursing administrators in long-term care facilities from five southern states. A demographic questionnaire collected information on nursing education and institutional characteristics of the nursing administrators. Chi-square analysis was used for all the collected data. The findings indicated that 25 (71.4%) of the nursing administrators surveyed in the long-term care facilities did not have an undergraduate degree in nursing. The dominant primary self-perceived leadership style score on the LEAD-Self instrument chosen by 23 (65.7%) of the nursing administrator participants was coaching (selling). The secondary self-perceived leadership style choice used by 15 (42.9%) of the respondents was supporting (participative). There was a significant relationship (p = .011) between the leadership style adaptability and age. Of the nursing administrators reporting, 30 (85.7%) had an annual turnover rate of 10% or greater of directed personnel.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducation Levels and Self-Perception of Leadership Styles of Long-Term Care Nursing Administrators/Directors of Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148194-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Education Levels and Self-Perception of Leadership Styles of Long-Term Care Nursing Administrators/Directors of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Foote, Dorothy Gargis, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alabama in Huntsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">footed@uah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the self-perceived leadership styles of nursing administrators employed in long-term care facilities and to study the relationship between educational level, nursing institutional characteristics, and the self-perceived leadership styles. Using the Hersey and Blanchard (1979, 2000) LEAD-Self instrument, data was collected on the self-perceived primary and secondary leadership styles, style range, and style adaptability of 35 randomly selected, participating nursing administrators in long-term care facilities from five southern states. A demographic questionnaire collected information on nursing education and institutional characteristics of the nursing administrators. Chi-square analysis was used for all the collected data. The findings indicated that 25 (71.4%) of the nursing administrators surveyed in the long-term care facilities did not have an undergraduate degree in nursing. The dominant primary self-perceived leadership style score on the LEAD-Self instrument chosen by 23 (65.7%) of the nursing administrator participants was coaching (selling). The secondary self-perceived leadership style choice used by 15 (42.9%) of the respondents was supporting (participative). There was a significant relationship (p = .011) between the leadership style adaptability and age. Of the nursing administrators reporting, 30 (85.7%) had an annual turnover rate of 10% or greater of directed personnel.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:41:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:41:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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