2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148202
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing Nursing Scholarship among Ugandan Students
Abstract:
Developing Nursing Scholarship among Ugandan Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:George, Valerie D., PhD, RN
Title:Visiting Professor
Uganda is a developing nation that has experienced significant changes related to war, political upheaval and HIV-AIDS. Nursing is viewed as a vital component of the health sector and is expected to take a leadership role in primary health care to enable the country to achieve the World Health Organization’s goals of Health for All. However, a cadre of nursing professionals is not available to meet the expectations for the profession. Seriously lacking is a body of Ugandan literature related to nursing practice, education or research that can be used to frame practice, and a significant number of indigenous persons with educational preparation to take leadership roles in these endeavors. Nurse educators have the enviable tasks of not only preparing students for professional nursing practice, but also helping to begin the process of building a body of literature for the discipline. The purpose of this presentation is to describe strategies used to motivate mature entry and direct entry nursing students in an undergraduate nursing program in Uganda, East Africa to begin contributing to the development and dissemination of nursing knowledge. This presentation focuses on how leadership roles were used in the educational process to move nursing students and Ugandan nursing leaders to work toward developing mechanisms for developing and disseminating scholarship and the outcomes of the process. Teaching strategies centered on (a) increasing students’ awareness of the paucity of nursing scholarship in Uganda; (b) using reflection and brainstorming to envision goals and possibilities for developing nursing scholarship; (c) helping students to articulate and affirm professional values regarding the importance of scholarship; and (d) providing opportunities for students to engage in scholarly activities. Collaboration with nursing influentials to achieve a workable unity regarding the problem and a forum for dissemination of students' work was essential.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping Nursing Scholarship among Ugandan Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148202-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing Nursing Scholarship among Ugandan Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">George, Valerie D., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Visiting Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">v.george@csuohio.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Uganda is a developing nation that has experienced significant changes related to war, political upheaval and HIV-AIDS. Nursing is viewed as a vital component of the health sector and is expected to take a leadership role in primary health care to enable the country to achieve the World Health Organization&rsquo;s goals of Health for All. However, a cadre of nursing professionals is not available to meet the expectations for the profession. Seriously lacking is a body of Ugandan literature related to nursing practice, education or research that can be used to frame practice, and a significant number of indigenous persons with educational preparation to take leadership roles in these endeavors. Nurse educators have the enviable tasks of not only preparing students for professional nursing practice, but also helping to begin the process of building a body of literature for the discipline. The purpose of this presentation is to describe strategies used to motivate mature entry and direct entry nursing students in an undergraduate nursing program in Uganda, East Africa to begin contributing to the development and dissemination of nursing knowledge. This presentation focuses on how leadership roles were used in the educational process to move nursing students and Ugandan nursing leaders to work toward developing mechanisms for developing and disseminating scholarship and the outcomes of the process. Teaching strategies centered on (a) increasing students&rsquo; awareness of the paucity of nursing scholarship in Uganda; (b) using reflection and brainstorming to envision goals and possibilities for developing nursing scholarship; (c) helping students to articulate and affirm professional values regarding the importance of scholarship; and (d) providing opportunities for students to engage in scholarly activities. Collaboration with nursing influentials to achieve a workable unity regarding the problem and a forum for dissemination of students' work was essential.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:41:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:41:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.