Examining the Relationship between Working Conditions and Medical Errors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148206
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining the Relationship between Working Conditions and Medical Errors
Abstract:
Examining the Relationship between Working Conditions and Medical Errors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Grayson, Deborah L., RN, MSN, MPH, COHN-S
P.I. Institution Name:Washington University in St. Louis
Title:Clinical Research Nurse Coordinator
Co-Authors:Patricia A. Potter, RN, MSN, PhD; Stuart Boxerman, DSc; Laurie Wolf, MS; Sarah Vandaveer, BS; Bradley Evanoff, MD, MPH
Objective: To determine if medical errors are triggered by specific working conditions. Design: An ongoing case-crossover study involving a research partnership between medical and nursing researchers and a regional hospital network. Population, Sample, Setting: Nurses (anticipated n=300) employed throughout a large hospital system. Concept or Variables Studied Together: Changing work conditions such as work pace, staffing levels, shift duration, sleep deprivation, distractions, and unfamiliar equipment or work unit. Methods: We are interviewing nurses who report that they made an error and are comparing the working conditions on the error shift with a non-error shift. Findings: Preliminary data (n=21) indicate that errors occur when the nursing shift has fewer staff, is “more hectic”, or involves higher acuity patients. On the error shift, nurses feel more ill, rushed, and distracted. They also have additional nursing responsibilities (eg. being in charge, orientating new staff members, being on the code team) on the error shift. Over 50% of nurses state the quality of report on the error shift is less than adequate. Interestingly, on both error and non-error shifts, over 80% of nurses report that they’re missing important patient information. Conclusions: Errors tend to occur on shifts associated with decreased staffing, sicker patients, and when nurses have increased responsibilities. Nurses are missing important patient information on both error and non-error shifts. Implications: Errors tend to occur on busier, more demanding shifts even though the majority of nurses report missing important information on all shifts. This suggests that on non-error shifts, nurses have the opportunity to clarify existing information or obtain additional information to ensure proper patient care. Alterations to the work environment, including limiting nursing responsibilities to direct patient care, may lead to reductions in medical errors and improve patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining the Relationship between Working Conditions and Medical Errorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148206-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining the Relationship between Working Conditions and Medical Errors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grayson, Deborah L., RN, MSN, MPH, COHN-S</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington University in St. Louis</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Research Nurse Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dgrayson@im.wustl.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia A. Potter, RN, MSN, PhD; Stuart Boxerman, DSc; Laurie Wolf, MS; Sarah Vandaveer, BS; Bradley Evanoff, MD, MPH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To determine if medical errors are triggered by specific working conditions. Design: An ongoing case-crossover study involving a research partnership between medical and nursing researchers and a regional hospital network. Population, Sample, Setting: Nurses (anticipated n=300) employed throughout a large hospital system. Concept or Variables Studied Together: Changing work conditions such as work pace, staffing levels, shift duration, sleep deprivation, distractions, and unfamiliar equipment or work unit. Methods: We are interviewing nurses who report that they made an error and are comparing the working conditions on the error shift with a non-error shift. Findings: Preliminary data (n=21) indicate that errors occur when the nursing shift has fewer staff, is &ldquo;more hectic&rdquo;, or involves higher acuity patients. On the error shift, nurses feel more ill, rushed, and distracted. They also have additional nursing responsibilities (eg. being in charge, orientating new staff members, being on the code team) on the error shift. Over 50% of nurses state the quality of report on the error shift is less than adequate. Interestingly, on both error and non-error shifts, over 80% of nurses report that they&rsquo;re missing important patient information. Conclusions: Errors tend to occur on shifts associated with decreased staffing, sicker patients, and when nurses have increased responsibilities. Nurses are missing important patient information on both error and non-error shifts. Implications: Errors tend to occur on busier, more demanding shifts even though the majority of nurses report missing important information on all shifts. This suggests that on non-error shifts, nurses have the opportunity to clarify existing information or obtain additional information to ensure proper patient care. Alterations to the work environment, including limiting nursing responsibilities to direct patient care, may lead to reductions in medical errors and improve patient care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:41:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:41:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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