How Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) Perceive Themselves as Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148207
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) Perceive Themselves as Nurses
Abstract:
How Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) Perceive Themselves as Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Greenfield, Linda Sue, CRNA, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Adelphi University
Nursing and medicine are not separated by a clearly marked boundary. Probably nowhere is the overlap greater than in the field of anesthesia, as this is a recognized specialty within both professions. The certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) and physician anesthetists (MDAs) do not just overlap; a CRNA is a complete substitute for an MDA. It is for this reason that the practice of nursing as a nurse anesthetists is unique. Nurse anesthetists are said to have an identity problem. Nursing has been described and defined in many ways, yet there remains a sense of enigma within the field of nurse anesthetists. The purpose of this study was to explore the CRNAs’ perception of themselves as nurses. This study is built upon the concepts of career satisfaction, residual learning, and career development within the context of a women’s life development. The female participants were from a random sample representing all regions of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. The sample included CRNAs with at least five years of clinical practice as a CRNA. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and were interviewed by telephone. Verbatim data from the tape-recorded sessions and field notes provided the texts for the analysis. Five themes were identified: 1) CRNAs are nurses and can identify specific acts of nursing; 2) CRNAs have enhanced patient responsibilities in comparison to the staff nurse; 3) CRNAs are ambivalent about other nurses; 4) CRNAs have a more holistic role emphasis than the MDAs; and 5) That job dissatisfaction led to a career change. These themes reflect the essence of the CRNAs’ clinical practice. The identification of these themes and their exhaustive descriptions contribute to an understanding of the fundamental structure of the CRNAs’ perception of themselves as nurses in their clinical practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) Perceive Themselves as Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148207-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) Perceive Themselves as Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Greenfield, Linda Sue, CRNA, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Adelphi University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">DOCLSG@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing and medicine are not separated by a clearly marked boundary. Probably nowhere is the overlap greater than in the field of anesthesia, as this is a recognized specialty within both professions. The certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) and physician anesthetists (MDAs) do not just overlap; a CRNA is a complete substitute for an MDA. It is for this reason that the practice of nursing as a nurse anesthetists is unique. Nurse anesthetists are said to have an identity problem. Nursing has been described and defined in many ways, yet there remains a sense of enigma within the field of nurse anesthetists. The purpose of this study was to explore the CRNAs&rsquo; perception of themselves as nurses. This study is built upon the concepts of career satisfaction, residual learning, and career development within the context of a women&rsquo;s life development. The female participants were from a random sample representing all regions of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. The sample included CRNAs with at least five years of clinical practice as a CRNA. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and were interviewed by telephone. Verbatim data from the tape-recorded sessions and field notes provided the texts for the analysis. Five themes were identified: 1) CRNAs are nurses and can identify specific acts of nursing; 2) CRNAs have enhanced patient responsibilities in comparison to the staff nurse; 3) CRNAs are ambivalent about other nurses; 4) CRNAs have a more holistic role emphasis than the MDAs; and 5) That job dissatisfaction led to a career change. These themes reflect the essence of the CRNAs&rsquo; clinical practice. The identification of these themes and their exhaustive descriptions contribute to an understanding of the fundamental structure of the CRNAs&rsquo; perception of themselves as nurses in their clinical practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:41:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:41:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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