2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148216
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Alzheimer's Disease: Behaviors from Past Self Identities
Abstract:
Alzheimer's Disease: Behaviors from Past Self Identities
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Harrison, Barbara E., RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Co-Authors:Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN; Bruno J. Giordani, PhD
Caring for people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a growing nursing challenge because of the significant behavior problems associated with it. Problem: To determine if there are memory and cognitive differences between Alzheimer's Disease (AD) subjects with and without "Behaviors from Past Self Identities" (BPSI). BPSI are defined as dementia behaviors that reflect active use of an accurate past self identity. Examples include AD patients who insist they must go to work or find their young children. The behaviors can be disruptive yet no studies were found that explain BPSI or guide nursing interventions. Pilot work on BPSI (2001) found family caregivers reported twenty percent (20%) of mild to moderate AD patients had BPSI. Practice level framework hypothesized that BPSI subjects are different from other AD subjects in perception of past identities, autobiographical memory (AM),attention skills, and fluency. This cross-sectional between group design study recruited a convenience sample of forty-four (44) mild to moderate AD subjects through the an Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC). Subjects completed a battery of measures for fluency, attention, and autobiographical memory. Subjects were 98% Caucasian, 54% male, and 76% resided at home. Sample means were age 77 years, 14 years education, and 16 on Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) which is moderate staged dementia. Results: Twenty percent of moderate staged AD subjects had BPSI. Mean MMSE for BPSI subjects was 13.2. BPSI subjects scored significantly worse on a measure of selective attention (p=.004) (Trails Making Tests) and on past incidents in autobiographical memory (AM) (p=.008). No fluency differences emerged. No differences in importance of past self identities emerged although trends for changes in self identity as dementia progressses were observed. Conclusions: BPSI are common behaviors among moderate AD patients. An impoverished past self memory and impaired attention contribute to these behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAlzheimer's Disease: Behaviors from Past Self Identitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148216-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Alzheimer's Disease: Behaviors from Past Self Identities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harrison, Barbara E., RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bhn@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN; Bruno J. Giordani, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Caring for people with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a growing nursing challenge because of the significant behavior problems associated with it. Problem: To determine if there are memory and cognitive differences between Alzheimer's Disease (AD) subjects with and without &quot;Behaviors from Past Self Identities&quot; (BPSI). BPSI are defined as dementia behaviors that reflect active use of an accurate past self identity. Examples include AD patients who insist they must go to work or find their young children. The behaviors can be disruptive yet no studies were found that explain BPSI or guide nursing interventions. Pilot work on BPSI (2001) found family caregivers reported twenty percent (20%) of mild to moderate AD patients had BPSI. Practice level framework hypothesized that BPSI subjects are different from other AD subjects in perception of past identities, autobiographical memory (AM),attention skills, and fluency. This cross-sectional between group design study recruited a convenience sample of forty-four (44) mild to moderate AD subjects through the an Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC). Subjects completed a battery of measures for fluency, attention, and autobiographical memory. Subjects were 98% Caucasian, 54% male, and 76% resided at home. Sample means were age 77 years, 14 years education, and 16 on Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) which is moderate staged dementia. Results: Twenty percent of moderate staged AD subjects had BPSI. Mean MMSE for BPSI subjects was 13.2. BPSI subjects scored significantly worse on a measure of selective attention (p=.004) (Trails Making Tests) and on past incidents in autobiographical memory (AM) (p=.008). No fluency differences emerged. No differences in importance of past self identities emerged although trends for changes in self identity as dementia progressses were observed. Conclusions: BPSI are common behaviors among moderate AD patients. An impoverished past self memory and impaired attention contribute to these behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:41:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:41:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.