The Influence of Demographic and Psychosocial Factors on Reported Teasing and Bullying Experiences in Middle-School Youth

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148223
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Demographic and Psychosocial Factors on Reported Teasing and Bullying Experiences in Middle-School Youth
Abstract:
The Influence of Demographic and Psychosocial Factors on Reported Teasing and Bullying Experiences in Middle-School Youth
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Horowitz, June A., PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Boston College
Co-Authors:Judith A. Vessey, PhD, MBA, FAAN; Karen L. Carlson, RNC, PhD; Mary E. Duffy, PhD, FAAN; Joyce David, BSN, MSNc; Katherine Gregory, MSN
Objective: This study determined whether demographic and psychosocial factors explain reported teasing and bullying experiences in a sample of middle-school youth. Design: Non-experimental descriptive explanatory design. Population, Sample, Setting: Data were collected from this nonprobability purposive sample of 708 youth in grades 6-8 from schools in Massachusetts, North Carolina, Mississippi, New Mexico, and Montana. Study Variables: The predictor variables were youth demographics (age, race/ethnicity, siblings, school grade, course grades, SES) child's self-concept and psychosocial problems. The outcome variable was child-reported teasing and bullying experiences. Methods: The sample of 708 middle-school youth, 52% female and 48% male,with 74% white, 11% Latino/Hispanic, 10% Black/African-American and 5% other. Almost 64% reported grades of A's and B's. Over 90% of parents were high school graduates. The test packet included a demographic form, Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale, (PHCSCS) the Pediatric Symptom Checklist, and the Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale (CATS). All measures demonstrated Cronbach's alphas ranging from .84-.93. Findings: Data were examined for systematic missing data, marked skewness, outliers and multicollinearity. Hierarchical multiple regression with forced entry at each step was used to answer the research question. A total of 22% of adjusted variance in teasing and bullying was explained mainly by two of the six PHCSCS subscales. Conclusions: Regardless of their gender, race, grade, SES, and psychosocial factors, middle school youth who had lower self-concept scores related to behavior, anxiety, and popularity but higher scores on intellectual and school status were more likely to report significantly higher teasing and bullying experiences than their counterparts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Demographic and Psychosocial Factors on Reported Teasing and Bullying Experiences in Middle-School Youthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148223-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Influence of Demographic and Psychosocial Factors on Reported Teasing and Bullying Experiences in Middle-School Youth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Horowitz, June A., PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston College</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">horowitz@bc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Vessey, PhD, MBA, FAAN; Karen L. Carlson, RNC, PhD; Mary E. Duffy, PhD, FAAN; Joyce David, BSN, MSNc; Katherine Gregory, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study determined whether demographic and psychosocial factors explain reported teasing and bullying experiences in a sample of middle-school youth. Design: Non-experimental descriptive explanatory design. Population, Sample, Setting: Data were collected from this nonprobability purposive sample of 708 youth in grades 6-8 from schools in Massachusetts, North Carolina, Mississippi, New Mexico, and Montana. Study Variables: The predictor variables were youth demographics (age, race/ethnicity, siblings, school grade, course grades, SES) child's self-concept and psychosocial problems. The outcome variable was child-reported teasing and bullying experiences. Methods: The sample of 708 middle-school youth, 52% female and 48% male,with 74% white, 11% Latino/Hispanic, 10% Black/African-American and 5% other. Almost 64% reported grades of A's and B's. Over 90% of parents were high school graduates. The test packet included a demographic form, Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale, (PHCSCS) the Pediatric Symptom Checklist, and the Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale (CATS). All measures demonstrated Cronbach's alphas ranging from .84-.93. Findings: Data were examined for systematic missing data, marked skewness, outliers and multicollinearity. Hierarchical multiple regression with forced entry at each step was used to answer the research question. A total of 22% of adjusted variance in teasing and bullying was explained mainly by two of the six PHCSCS subscales. Conclusions: Regardless of their gender, race, grade, SES, and psychosocial factors, middle school youth who had lower self-concept scores related to behavior, anxiety, and popularity but higher scores on intellectual and school status were more likely to report significantly higher teasing and bullying experiences than their counterparts.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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