St. Anthony's Infant Program: Nursing Intervention for Healthy Family Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148230
Type:
Presentation
Title:
St. Anthony's Infant Program: Nursing Intervention for Healthy Family Outcomes
Abstract:
St. Anthony's Infant Program: Nursing Intervention for Healthy Family Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Jenkins, Ruth L., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-St. Louis
Title:Associate Professor
Objectives: McCubbin’s Resiliency Model was used to guide the concept of maternal appraisal and an intervention to decrease potential variables for child abuse. Design: Pre-post survey. Setting: All birthing mothers at a private mid-west hospital received instruction on positive parenting, shaken baby syndrome and infant massage. Data Variables, collected during hospitalization and one month post discharge were: 1) mother’s perception about her baby as compared to the average baby, 2) degree of bother, to the mother, of baby spitting up, crying, unpredictable schedule, and elimination, and 3) mothers’ feelings of anxiety, depression, and hostility. The Study Sample: birthing mothers (n=380). Findings: Statistical significant correlations were found at time one (hospitalization) between anxiousness and depression (r=.141 alpha .01), low degree of bother score and low depression (r=.122 alpha .01), greater hostility and lower depression (r=.234 alpha .01), positive view of infant and lower Degree of Bother Score (r=.159 alpha .01), and depression at discharge and greater Degree of Bother Score (r=-.357 alpha .05). At time two (one month post discharge) mother’s who breast fed scored more negatively the way she viewed her baby as compared to the average baby (r=.336 alpha .01) While not statistically significant, a clinical trend was found between continued use of infant massage for lower anxiety, hostility and Degree of Bother Scores. The percent of mothers experiencing depression one month post discharge had decreased by one –half. Conclusions: In hospital nursing interventions can impact maternal response to her newborn that can have a positive effect on child abuse variables; breast feeding mothers need continual support interventions that will promote a positive view of the newborn. Implications: In house childbirth interventions need to provide breast-feeding mothers continued follow-up and support for positive maternal-infant interaction and maternal perception of the infant. Infant massage may impact positive maternal infant interaction.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSt. Anthony's Infant Program: Nursing Intervention for Healthy Family Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148230-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">St. Anthony's Infant Program: Nursing Intervention for Healthy Family Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jenkins, Ruth L., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-St. Louis</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">DrRuth@umsl.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: McCubbin&rsquo;s Resiliency Model was used to guide the concept of maternal appraisal and an intervention to decrease potential variables for child abuse. Design: Pre-post survey. Setting: All birthing mothers at a private mid-west hospital received instruction on positive parenting, shaken baby syndrome and infant massage. Data Variables, collected during hospitalization and one month post discharge were: 1) mother&rsquo;s perception about her baby as compared to the average baby, 2) degree of bother, to the mother, of baby spitting up, crying, unpredictable schedule, and elimination, and 3) mothers&rsquo; feelings of anxiety, depression, and hostility. The Study Sample: birthing mothers (n=380). Findings: Statistical significant correlations were found at time one (hospitalization) between anxiousness and depression (r=.141 alpha .01), low degree of bother score and low depression (r=.122 alpha .01), greater hostility and lower depression (r=.234 alpha .01), positive view of infant and lower Degree of Bother Score (r=.159 alpha .01), and depression at discharge and greater Degree of Bother Score (r=-.357 alpha .05). At time two (one month post discharge) mother&rsquo;s who breast fed scored more negatively the way she viewed her baby as compared to the average baby (r=.336 alpha .01) While not statistically significant, a clinical trend was found between continued use of infant massage for lower anxiety, hostility and Degree of Bother Scores. The percent of mothers experiencing depression one month post discharge had decreased by one &ndash;half. Conclusions: In hospital nursing interventions can impact maternal response to her newborn that can have a positive effect on child abuse variables; breast feeding mothers need continual support interventions that will promote a positive view of the newborn. Implications: In house childbirth interventions need to provide breast-feeding mothers continued follow-up and support for positive maternal-infant interaction and maternal perception of the infant. Infant massage may impact positive maternal infant interaction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.