Dyadic Trust, Sexual Imposition, and Sensation Seeking with Young, Urban Women’s HIV Sexual Risk Behaviors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148233
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dyadic Trust, Sexual Imposition, and Sensation Seeking with Young, Urban Women’s HIV Sexual Risk Behaviors
Abstract:
Dyadic Trust, Sexual Imposition, and Sensation Seeking with Young, Urban Women’s HIV Sexual Risk Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Jones, Rachel, PhD, RN, FNP
P.I. Institution Name:Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective. To explore trust, sexual imposition, and sensation seeking with young, urban women’s HIV sexual risk behaviors. Design. Quantitative, cross sectional. Population, Sample, Setting. The sample was 257 women, aged 18 to 29, in public housing, a public nutrition center, a public STD clinic, and a two year county community college in an urban HIV epicenter. Variables. Dyadic trust, measured by the Dyadic Trust Scale (Larzelere & Huston, 1980), is a belief that the partner is benevolent and honest. Sexual imposition (Hoskins, 1988) is an expectation that a male partner’s sexual satisfaction is more important than women’s own feelings of ambivalence or imposition. Sensation seeking, measured by the Sensation Seeking Scale in Urban Women (Jones, 2002), is a culture appropriate version of Zuckerman’s Sensation Seeking Scale (1994). Sexual risk behavior, measured by the Women’s Relative Sexual Risk Scale (Jones, 2002), is unprotected sex with male partners women are unsure, or perceive to engage in HIV risk behaviors. Methods. Surveys were conducted using audio computer assisted self-interview. Data were analyzed by hierarchical multiple regression. Findings. The study variables contributed 19 % of the variance in sexual risk behaviors. Sexual imposition alone contributed 13%. Dyadic trust was a suppressor variable, not correlated with sexual risk behaviors. There effect of sensation seeking was small and significant. Conclusions. Feeling sexually imposed is an important factor in sexual risk behaviors. Trust did not relate to unprotected sex. There was a mild tendency among high sensation seeking women to engage in sexual risk behaviors. Implications. For young, urban women, trust does not appear to be an idealized heuristic about men. Sexual risk is an inessential aspect of sensation seeking involving adventure and not dangerous liaisons. More research into sexual pressure and tailoring sexual health promotion to high sensation seeking young, urban women is needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDyadic Trust, Sexual Imposition, and Sensation Seeking with Young, Urban Women’s HIV Sexual Risk Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148233-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dyadic Trust, Sexual Imposition, and Sensation Seeking with Young, Urban Women&rsquo;s HIV Sexual Risk Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Rachel, PhD, RN, FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jones@nightingale.rutgers.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective. To explore trust, sexual imposition, and sensation seeking with young, urban women&rsquo;s HIV sexual risk behaviors. Design. Quantitative, cross sectional. Population, Sample, Setting. The sample was 257 women, aged 18 to 29, in public housing, a public nutrition center, a public STD clinic, and a two year county community college in an urban HIV epicenter. Variables. Dyadic trust, measured by the Dyadic Trust Scale (Larzelere &amp; Huston, 1980), is a belief that the partner is benevolent and honest. Sexual imposition (Hoskins, 1988) is an expectation that a male partner&rsquo;s sexual satisfaction is more important than women&rsquo;s own feelings of ambivalence or imposition. Sensation seeking, measured by the Sensation Seeking Scale in Urban Women (Jones, 2002), is a culture appropriate version of Zuckerman&rsquo;s Sensation Seeking Scale (1994). Sexual risk behavior, measured by the Women&rsquo;s Relative Sexual Risk Scale (Jones, 2002), is unprotected sex with male partners women are unsure, or perceive to engage in HIV risk behaviors. Methods. Surveys were conducted using audio computer assisted self-interview. Data were analyzed by hierarchical multiple regression. Findings. The study variables contributed 19 % of the variance in sexual risk behaviors. Sexual imposition alone contributed 13%. Dyadic trust was a suppressor variable, not correlated with sexual risk behaviors. There effect of sensation seeking was small and significant. Conclusions. Feeling sexually imposed is an important factor in sexual risk behaviors. Trust did not relate to unprotected sex. There was a mild tendency among high sensation seeking women to engage in sexual risk behaviors. Implications. For young, urban women, trust does not appear to be an idealized heuristic about men. Sexual risk is an inessential aspect of sensation seeking involving adventure and not dangerous liaisons. More research into sexual pressure and tailoring sexual health promotion to high sensation seeking young, urban women is needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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