Research Utilization in Civilian and Military Organizations: An Exploration Among Canadian and American Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148239
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Research Utilization in Civilian and Military Organizations: An Exploration Among Canadian and American Nurses
Abstract:
Research Utilization in Civilian and Military Organizations: An Exploration Among Canadian and American Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Kenny, Deborah J., RN, PhD, LTC, US, Army, Nurse, C
P.I. Institution Name:Walter Reed Army Medical Center
Co-Authors:Carole A. Estabrooks, RN, PhD; Adeniyi J. Adewale, BTech, MSc, PhD; Huey Chong, BSc; Kristie Saumure, BA, MLIS; Charles Humphrey, MA
Objective: This study compared research utilization among nurses sampled from two different organizational and geographical contexts across time. Specific objectives included (a) the identification of important determinants of research utilization in these contexts, and (b) the assessment of organizational factors in predicting research use. Population: Data was taken from a study conducted in Canadian civilian hospitals in 1996 (n=600) and a study of registered nurses working in three military hospitals in the United States (n=290). Method: The predictors of research utilization in these contexts were determined using multiple linear regression analysis. Findings: The following concepts were determined to influence one or more types of research utilization: belief suspension, attitude to research, time to participate in research/projects, presence of a research champion, variety of knowledge sources, and number of in-services attended. The two environments (i.e., civilian vs. military) in the study are not significantly different in their overall research use behaviors after accounting for the effects of other predictors. However, interactions between some main factors and the environment were significant in the model. These factors include: number of in-services, attitude, belief, years of experience, and organizational time. Conclusion: A comparison of the two organizational environments suggested that research use was more established in the civilian practice environment. Some of the differences in research utilization between nurses in the American military hospitals and those in the Canadian civilian hospitals supported previous study findings and some diverged.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResearch Utilization in Civilian and Military Organizations: An Exploration Among Canadian and American Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148239-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Research Utilization in Civilian and Military Organizations: An Exploration Among Canadian and American Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kenny, Deborah J., RN, PhD, LTC, US, Army, Nurse, C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Walter Reed Army Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">deborah.kenny@na.amedd.army.mil</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carole A. Estabrooks, RN, PhD; Adeniyi J. Adewale, BTech, MSc, PhD; Huey Chong, BSc; Kristie Saumure, BA, MLIS; Charles Humphrey, MA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study compared research utilization among nurses sampled from two different organizational and geographical contexts across time. Specific objectives included (a) the identification of important determinants of research utilization in these contexts, and (b) the assessment of organizational factors in predicting research use. Population: Data was taken from a study conducted in Canadian civilian hospitals in 1996 (n=600) and a study of registered nurses working in three military hospitals in the United States (n=290). Method: The predictors of research utilization in these contexts were determined using multiple linear regression analysis. Findings: The following concepts were determined to influence one or more types of research utilization: belief suspension, attitude to research, time to participate in research/projects, presence of a research champion, variety of knowledge sources, and number of in-services attended. The two environments (i.e., civilian vs. military) in the study are not significantly different in their overall research use behaviors after accounting for the effects of other predictors. However, interactions between some main factors and the environment were significant in the model. These factors include: number of in-services, attitude, belief, years of experience, and organizational time. Conclusion: A comparison of the two organizational environments suggested that research use was more established in the civilian practice environment. Some of the differences in research utilization between nurses in the American military hospitals and those in the Canadian civilian hospitals supported previous study findings and some diverged.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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