Correlates of Lipodystrophic Symptoms and Complementary Therapies

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148242
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of Lipodystrophic Symptoms and Complementary Therapies
Abstract:
Correlates of Lipodystrophic Symptoms and Complementary Therapies
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Kirksey, Kenn M., RN, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Fresno
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Inge B. Corless, RN, PhD, FAAN; Patrice Kenneally Nicholas, RN, DNSc, MPH, ANP; Jeanne Kemppainen, RN, PhD, CNS; Margaret E. Mueller, RN, MSN
Persons living with HIV/AIDS are challenged to manage disease and treatment- related symptoms with provider-directed or client-initiated self-care strategies. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in HIV care has increased significantly in recent years. Objective: The primary objective of this study was to identify CAM therapies used as self-care strategies by persons living with HIV/AIDS to manage lipodystrophy-associated symptoms. Design: Using a cross-sectional, descriptive design, data were obtained regarding types, frequencies, perceived effectiveness and sources of information about the CAM therapies used to self-manage HIV disease and treatment-related symptoms. Population, Sample, Setting: Data were collected from three community-based facilities around the USA; California (n=93), Massachusetts (n=50) and Texas (n=22), for a total of 165 subjects. Variables: This paper explores the correlation of CAM therapies and lipodystrophic symptomatology. Methods: The study sample completed an assessment packet that included sociodemographic data, nine investigator-initiated, open-ended questions designed to explore lipodystrophic manifestations and self-care measures used to manage HIV-related symptoms. Findings: The sample included 165 HIV-infected persons between the ages of 21 and 62 years, with a mean age of 42.12 (+ 8.29). The participants were comprised of 125 (75.8%) males and 40 (24.2%) females. Approximately 39% were Caucasian, 30.9% African American, and 26.7% Hispanic. Formal education ranged from 3-20 years, with a mean of 12.20 (+ 2.45) years. The mean CD4+ was 420.66 cells/mm3 (+ 311.07), and the mean viral load was 45951 (+ 99558). Clients used a large number of CAM therapies, with prayer, spirituality, and meditation being among the most frequently reported. Conclusions: Lipodystrophy is a pervasive problem and the sample reported a number of CAM therapies as self-initiated care strategies. Implications: There is clear evidence in the literature about widespread use of these modalities in HIV-infected persons, but studies to explore reasons for use and efficacy are still needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of Lipodystrophic Symptoms and Complementary Therapiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148242-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Correlates of Lipodystrophic Symptoms and Complementary Therapies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kirksey, Kenn M., RN, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Fresno</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kkirksey@csufresno.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Inge B. Corless, RN, PhD, FAAN; Patrice Kenneally Nicholas, RN, DNSc, MPH, ANP; Jeanne Kemppainen, RN, PhD, CNS; Margaret E. Mueller, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Persons living with HIV/AIDS are challenged to manage disease and treatment- related symptoms with provider-directed or client-initiated self-care strategies. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in HIV care has increased significantly in recent years. Objective: The primary objective of this study was to identify CAM therapies used as self-care strategies by persons living with HIV/AIDS to manage lipodystrophy-associated symptoms. Design: Using a cross-sectional, descriptive design, data were obtained regarding types, frequencies, perceived effectiveness and sources of information about the CAM therapies used to self-manage HIV disease and treatment-related symptoms. Population, Sample, Setting: Data were collected from three community-based facilities around the USA; California (n=93), Massachusetts (n=50) and Texas (n=22), for a total of 165 subjects. Variables: This paper explores the correlation of CAM therapies and lipodystrophic symptomatology. Methods: The study sample completed an assessment packet that included sociodemographic data, nine investigator-initiated, open-ended questions designed to explore lipodystrophic manifestations and self-care measures used to manage HIV-related symptoms. Findings: The sample included 165 HIV-infected persons between the ages of 21 and 62 years, with a mean age of 42.12 (+ 8.29). The participants were comprised of 125 (75.8%) males and 40 (24.2%) females. Approximately 39% were Caucasian, 30.9% African American, and 26.7% Hispanic. Formal education ranged from 3-20 years, with a mean of 12.20 (+ 2.45) years. The mean CD4+ was 420.66 cells/mm3 (+ 311.07), and the mean viral load was 45951 (+ 99558). Clients used a large number of CAM therapies, with prayer, spirituality, and meditation being among the most frequently reported. Conclusions: Lipodystrophy is a pervasive problem and the sample reported a number of CAM therapies as self-initiated care strategies. Implications: There is clear evidence in the literature about widespread use of these modalities in HIV-infected persons, but studies to explore reasons for use and efficacy are still needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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