The Nature of Infant Relinquishment as Described by Two Voices: The Relinquishing Mother and the Obstetrical Nurse

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148243
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Nature of Infant Relinquishment as Described by Two Voices: The Relinquishing Mother and the Obstetrical Nurse
Abstract:
The Nature of Infant Relinquishment as Described by Two Voices: The Relinquishing Mother and the Obstetrical Nurse
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Kobokovich, Linda J., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
Title:Director of Nursing Practice
Little is known about the relinquishment experience and nursing interventions for infant relinquishment. The purpose of this study was to first, describe in the birth mother's voice, the relinquishment experience and her perception of nursing interventions, while second, creating an inventory of nursing interventions. Kim's (2000) Practice Domain provided the theoretical background. This two-phase study used an inductive, qualitative approach and employed a mixed method design of semi-structured interview and focus group interview. The interview was crafted upon the interview style of McCracken (1988) and Spradley (1969) while focus group methodology as detailed by Morgan (1993, 1996) guided the second phase of study. Three participants completed all or part of a series of three planned interviews while in the second phase; thirty practicing obstetrical nurses participated in one of six focus groups. The relinquishing mothers described infant relinquishment as difficult yet relieving. They were concerned about the well being of the baby, expressed sympathy for the adoptive family’s infertility, and admitted that they would like to keep the baby but some factor seriously impeded their ability to do so. Focus groups revealed that nurses do view relinquishing mothers and their babies as special. Nurses tried to 1) give the relinquishing mother as much control as possible while in the hospital, 2) be supportive and nonjudgmental, 3) provide mementos of the baby when asked, and 4) create an environment for the mother that was protective and caring. Nurses remained uncertain about the pros and cons of the relinquishing mother’s interaction with her baby and uncertainty in the mother raised the tensions and sense of caution in the nurse. The findings illustrate a beginning description of relinquishment and provide first hand evidence that allows the nurse to share knowledge and collectively establish taxonomy of common and unique nursing interventions for infant relinquishment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Nature of Infant Relinquishment as Described by Two Voices: The Relinquishing Mother and the Obstetrical Nurseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148243-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Nature of Infant Relinquishment as Described by Two Voices: The Relinquishing Mother and the Obstetrical Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kobokovich, Linda J., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Nursing Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Linda.Kobokovich@Hitchcock.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Little is known about the relinquishment experience and nursing interventions for infant relinquishment. The purpose of this study was to first, describe in the birth mother's voice, the relinquishment experience and her perception of nursing interventions, while second, creating an inventory of nursing interventions. Kim's (2000) Practice Domain provided the theoretical background. This two-phase study used an inductive, qualitative approach and employed a mixed method design of semi-structured interview and focus group interview. The interview was crafted upon the interview style of McCracken (1988) and Spradley (1969) while focus group methodology as detailed by Morgan (1993, 1996) guided the second phase of study. Three participants completed all or part of a series of three planned interviews while in the second phase; thirty practicing obstetrical nurses participated in one of six focus groups. The relinquishing mothers described infant relinquishment as difficult yet relieving. They were concerned about the well being of the baby, expressed sympathy for the adoptive family&rsquo;s infertility, and admitted that they would like to keep the baby but some factor seriously impeded their ability to do so. Focus groups revealed that nurses do view relinquishing mothers and their babies as special. Nurses tried to 1) give the relinquishing mother as much control as possible while in the hospital, 2) be supportive and nonjudgmental, 3) provide mementos of the baby when asked, and 4) create an environment for the mother that was protective and caring. Nurses remained uncertain about the pros and cons of the relinquishing mother&rsquo;s interaction with her baby and uncertainty in the mother raised the tensions and sense of caution in the nurse. The findings illustrate a beginning description of relinquishment and provide first hand evidence that allows the nurse to share knowledge and collectively establish taxonomy of common and unique nursing interventions for infant relinquishment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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