2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148249
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Support Intervention for Homeless Youth: Phase I Assessment
Abstract:
Support Intervention for Homeless Youth: Phase I Assessment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Letourneau, Nicole L., PhD, MN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta
Title:Post-doctoral Fellow
Co-Authors:Miriam J. Stewart, PhD; Linda Reutter, PhD, RN; Rachel G. Campbell, MA
Background. Homeless youth are vulnerable to social isolation, violence, sexual abuse, drug abuse, and poverty, placing them at increased risk for adverse physical and mental health outcomes. In Phase I of a study designed to provide support to homeless youth in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, the key characteristics and challenges, unmet support needs, and desirable support interventions of homeless youth were assessed. Individual semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with homeless youth (n=20) aged 16 to 25 and with service providers (n=20) for homeless youth. Subsequently two focus groups with youth (n=12) and two with service providers (n=10) were conducted to seek feedback on preliminary findings. Transcripts were subjected to thematic content analysis. Key characteristics and challenges. The majority of homeless youth were characterized as segregated and alienated individuals. These included urban aboriginals and youth who had faced apprehension into children’s services, family violence, divorce, and/or poor parenting. Key challenges facing homeless youth included low self-worth, lack of concrete resources, and substance abuse. Unmet support needs. The majority of both homeless youth and service providers stated that while services were available, they did not fully meet existing needs. Unmet support needs included: lack of long-term commitment; need for more one-on-one/less procedural relationships; need for better understanding of homelessness; lack of youth specific services; and lack of easily accessible services. Desirable support intervention. Participants indicated that intervention should focus on emotional and affirmational support. Honesty and ability to relate to youth and homelessness were identified as critical attributes of support providers. Face-to-face support that was easily accessible, flexible, client-driven, long-term, committed, and that offered choice (e.g. one-on-one or group support) was recommended. Conclusion. These perspectives and experiences will guide the design of a support intervention for homeless youth to be tested in Phase II of this study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSupport Intervention for Homeless Youth: Phase I Assessmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148249-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Support Intervention for Homeless Youth: Phase I Assessment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Letourneau, Nicole L., PhD, MN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post-doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nicole.letourneau@ualberta.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Miriam J. Stewart, PhD; Linda Reutter, PhD, RN; Rachel G. Campbell, MA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background. Homeless youth are vulnerable to social isolation, violence, sexual abuse, drug abuse, and poverty, placing them at increased risk for adverse physical and mental health outcomes. In Phase I of a study designed to provide support to homeless youth in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, the key characteristics and challenges, unmet support needs, and desirable support interventions of homeless youth were assessed. Individual semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with homeless youth (n=20) aged 16 to 25 and with service providers (n=20) for homeless youth. Subsequently two focus groups with youth (n=12) and two with service providers (n=10) were conducted to seek feedback on preliminary findings. Transcripts were subjected to thematic content analysis. Key characteristics and challenges. The majority of homeless youth were characterized as segregated and alienated individuals. These included urban aboriginals and youth who had faced apprehension into children&rsquo;s services, family violence, divorce, and/or poor parenting. Key challenges facing homeless youth included low self-worth, lack of concrete resources, and substance abuse. Unmet support needs. The majority of both homeless youth and service providers stated that while services were available, they did not fully meet existing needs. Unmet support needs included: lack of long-term commitment; need for more one-on-one/less procedural relationships; need for better understanding of homelessness; lack of youth specific services; and lack of easily accessible services. Desirable support intervention. Participants indicated that intervention should focus on emotional and affirmational support. Honesty and ability to relate to youth and homelessness were identified as critical attributes of support providers. Face-to-face support that was easily accessible, flexible, client-driven, long-term, committed, and that offered choice (e.g. one-on-one or group support) was recommended. Conclusion. These perspectives and experiences will guide the design of a support intervention for homeless youth to be tested in Phase II of this study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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