The Effects of a Web-Based, Diabetes-Prevention Project on Food Choices in Minority Adolescents at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148252
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of a Web-Based, Diabetes-Prevention Project on Food Choices in Minority Adolescents at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes
Abstract:
The Effects of a Web-Based, Diabetes-Prevention Project on Food Choices in Minority Adolescents at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Long, JoAnn D., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Lubbock Christian University
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
Co-Authors:Myrna L. Armstrong, RN, EdD; Elizabeth Amos, PhD, RN, C, CS; LaNell Harrison, RN, BSN
Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to develop and test the effects of an interactive nutrition education website on fruit, vegetable, and fat consumption of minority adolescents at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. Design: A nonprobability sample of 21 minority adolescents enrolled in a local junior high school was recruited from a southwestern state. Subjects received 5 hours of web-based education on nutrition and exercise during a period of 3 weeks. Method: Demographic data and family history of diabetes were collected in face-to-face interviews. Height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) were measured on each subject. Subjects responded to a modified 24- our dietary recall and computer-based 24- hour dietary recall instrument. BMI data collected in the same school in 1999 was compared to the 2002 sample. Focus groups were conducted to evaluate student satisfaction with the web-based intervention. Findings: 1) A significant difference between pre and post-test mean scores for fat consumption was supported from computerized dietary assessment data. 2) No significant difference was found between pre and post-test fruit or vegetable scores from the computerized dietary assessment, or in the modified 24-hour recall. 3) The average BMI increased by 1.71 from 1999 to 2002. The number of students in the 25%-29.9% BMI range increased from 10% to 18% the same time period. Focus group evaluation indicated a high level of adolescent enjoyment with the web-based intervention. Conclusions: The nutrition education web site worked well with adolescents and is available for use as a part of school curricula and health education. Given the rising incidence of obesity and Type 2 diabetes among minority youths, future research of innovative, age-appropriate methods to influence dietary habits is recommended to help avert this significant public health trend.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of a Web-Based, Diabetes-Prevention Project on Food Choices in Minority Adolescents at Risk for Type 2 Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148252-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of a Web-Based, Diabetes-Prevention Project on Food Choices in Minority Adolescents at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Long, JoAnn D., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lubbock Christian University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joann.long@lcu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Myrna L. Armstrong, RN, EdD; Elizabeth Amos, PhD, RN, C, CS; LaNell Harrison, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to develop and test the effects of an interactive nutrition education website on fruit, vegetable, and fat consumption of minority adolescents at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. Design: A nonprobability sample of 21 minority adolescents enrolled in a local junior high school was recruited from a southwestern state. Subjects received 5 hours of web-based education on nutrition and exercise during a period of 3 weeks. Method: Demographic data and family history of diabetes were collected in face-to-face interviews. Height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) were measured on each subject. Subjects responded to a modified 24- our dietary recall and computer-based 24- hour dietary recall instrument. BMI data collected in the same school in 1999 was compared to the 2002 sample. Focus groups were conducted to evaluate student satisfaction with the web-based intervention. Findings: 1) A significant difference between pre and post-test mean scores for fat consumption was supported from computerized dietary assessment data. 2) No significant difference was found between pre and post-test fruit or vegetable scores from the computerized dietary assessment, or in the modified 24-hour recall. 3) The average BMI increased by 1.71 from 1999 to 2002. The number of students in the 25%-29.9% BMI range increased from 10% to 18% the same time period. Focus group evaluation indicated a high level of adolescent enjoyment with the web-based intervention. Conclusions: The nutrition education web site worked well with adolescents and is available for use as a part of school curricula and health education. Given the rising incidence of obesity and Type 2 diabetes among minority youths, future research of innovative, age-appropriate methods to influence dietary habits is recommended to help avert this significant public health trend.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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