Creating a Learning Environment of Success For New Graduates in Critical Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148273
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating a Learning Environment of Success For New Graduates in Critical Care
Abstract:
Creating a Learning Environment of Success For New Graduates in Critical Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Ciesielski, Scott
P.I. Institution Name:Massachusetts General Hospital
By the year 2020 the RN workforce is forecast to be nearly 20% below the projected need in American hospitals (Buerhaus et al., 2000). Specialty areas are currently experiencing acute shortages of RN's (Nevidjon and Erickson, 2001). At Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) the demand for critical care beds has increased while the number of unfilled positions has constrained capacity. This situation has challenged MGH leadership to develop new approaches to the recruitment and retention of critical care nurses. A New Graduate Critical Care Program, jointly developed by the MGH Department of Nursing and the MGH Institute of Health Professions, will begin in July, 2001. This program is designed to train baccalaureate nurses with little or no professional nursing experience. The program was developed through benchmarking comparative programs, literature review and a pilot study conducted with one new graduate RN. Participants will be salaried. A combined didactic and preceptored clinical training approach with narrative based reflective case study serves as the framework. Laboratory experience and three 10-hour clinical days, 8 hours of direct care followed by reflective review and/or seminar, are essential. Particular focus was directed toward the development of coaching/mentoring skills in preceptors. Additional strategies for success include the establishment of a leadership task force for program oversight consisting of nurse managers, clinical nurse specialists, preceptors and faculty. Evaluation of the program's goals and outcomes will be accomplished through the collection and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data. In addition to demographic and financial outcomes, the learning and mentoring process will be examined through thematic analysis of narrative data.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreating a Learning Environment of Success For New Graduates in Critical Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148273-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Creating a Learning Environment of Success For New Graduates in Critical Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ciesielski, Scott</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Massachusetts General Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sciesielski@partners.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">By the year 2020 the RN workforce is forecast to be nearly 20% below the projected need in American hospitals (Buerhaus et al., 2000). Specialty areas are currently experiencing acute shortages of RN's (Nevidjon and Erickson, 2001). At Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) the demand for critical care beds has increased while the number of unfilled positions has constrained capacity. This situation has challenged MGH leadership to develop new approaches to the recruitment and retention of critical care nurses. A New Graduate Critical Care Program, jointly developed by the MGH Department of Nursing and the MGH Institute of Health Professions, will begin in July, 2001. This program is designed to train baccalaureate nurses with little or no professional nursing experience. The program was developed through benchmarking comparative programs, literature review and a pilot study conducted with one new graduate RN. Participants will be salaried. A combined didactic and preceptored clinical training approach with narrative based reflective case study serves as the framework. Laboratory experience and three 10-hour clinical days, 8 hours of direct care followed by reflective review and/or seminar, are essential. Particular focus was directed toward the development of coaching/mentoring skills in preceptors. Additional strategies for success include the establishment of a leadership task force for program oversight consisting of nurse managers, clinical nurse specialists, preceptors and faculty. Evaluation of the program's goals and outcomes will be accomplished through the collection and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data. In addition to demographic and financial outcomes, the learning and mentoring process will be examined through thematic analysis of narrative data.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:46Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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