Nursing education success: Creating a pipeline for disadvantaged Arkansans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148275
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing education success: Creating a pipeline for disadvantaged Arkansans
Abstract:
Nursing education success: Creating a pipeline for disadvantaged Arkansans
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Thompson, Patricia
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
The Nursing Education Success (NES) program creates a pipeline for disadvantaged Arkansans, especially African American and Hispanic students, that extends from junior high, to high school, and through college. This pipeline creates opportunities for these disadvantaged ethnic and racial groups to enter and successfully complete the College of Nursing baccalaureate program, achieve success on the NCLEX examination, enter the Arkansas registered nursing workforce, and provide culturally sensitive care to underserved people. Phase I of the program is focused on junior and senior high school students. The emphasis in this phase is promoting nursing as a career choice and providing students the necessary knowledge and skills to enter and succeed in college. During Phase II, students in “feeder” colleges, are supported as they complete the prerequisites needed to enter the College of Nursing (CON). Once students have been admitted to the CON and selected for the NES program, they are in Phase III. In addition to educational support, the Phase III students receive a monthly stipend. One component of the program is a week long summer camp for NES students in junior and senior high school. The camp is designed to give students interested in nursing a better understanding of the different facets of the field, as well as assist them to develop a skills set necessary for educational success. This experience is an exciting, fun-filled learning opportunity. The camp content includes a variety of topics, after an orientation and tour of campus. Strategies for developing personal skills, such as time management and stress reduction, are included, as well as content on study skills and test taking. Students also have an opportunity for “hands on” experiences by completing a CPR course and learning first aid techniques. Participants spend time completing computer assisted instruction modules on topics such as basic anatomy and physiology. Each student has the opportunity to spend part of a day shadowing a nursing student to experience first hand how clinical learning occurs. The week finishes with information related to the profession of nursing and the various roles and opportunities available. Faculty, students, and nurses from the practice area are all involved in making summer camp a success. The atmosphere and relationships that develop during the week form the basis for a network that remains in place as the students return to their schools. Students not only leave camp with knowledge and skills to assist them in pursuing their goals, but with a support system that is available to them, on an ongoing basis. This grant was funded by Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources Services Administration.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing education success: Creating a pipeline for disadvantaged Arkansansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148275-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing education success: Creating a pipeline for disadvantaged Arkansans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thompson, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">thompsonpatricia@exchange.uams</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Nursing Education Success (NES) program creates a pipeline for disadvantaged Arkansans, especially African American and Hispanic students, that extends from junior high, to high school, and through college. This pipeline creates opportunities for these disadvantaged ethnic and racial groups to enter and successfully complete the College of Nursing baccalaureate program, achieve success on the NCLEX examination, enter the Arkansas registered nursing workforce, and provide culturally sensitive care to underserved people. Phase I of the program is focused on junior and senior high school students. The emphasis in this phase is promoting nursing as a career choice and providing students the necessary knowledge and skills to enter and succeed in college. During Phase II, students in &ldquo;feeder&rdquo; colleges, are supported as they complete the prerequisites needed to enter the College of Nursing (CON). Once students have been admitted to the CON and selected for the NES program, they are in Phase III. In addition to educational support, the Phase III students receive a monthly stipend. One component of the program is a week long summer camp for NES students in junior and senior high school. The camp is designed to give students interested in nursing a better understanding of the different facets of the field, as well as assist them to develop a skills set necessary for educational success. This experience is an exciting, fun-filled learning opportunity. The camp content includes a variety of topics, after an orientation and tour of campus. Strategies for developing personal skills, such as time management and stress reduction, are included, as well as content on study skills and test taking. Students also have an opportunity for &ldquo;hands on&rdquo; experiences by completing a CPR course and learning first aid techniques. Participants spend time completing computer assisted instruction modules on topics such as basic anatomy and physiology. Each student has the opportunity to spend part of a day shadowing a nursing student to experience first hand how clinical learning occurs. The week finishes with information related to the profession of nursing and the various roles and opportunities available. Faculty, students, and nurses from the practice area are all involved in making summer camp a success. The atmosphere and relationships that develop during the week form the basis for a network that remains in place as the students return to their schools. Students not only leave camp with knowledge and skills to assist them in pursuing their goals, but with a support system that is available to them, on an ongoing basis. This grant was funded by Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources Services Administration.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:47Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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