2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148283
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Third Visit
Abstract:
Third Visit
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Roberts, Karen
P.I. Institution Name:Internal Medicine Group
This poem is one of several reflections about my work as a hospice nurse. It is a very simple and short poem, about an old purse hanging on a doorknob, and what it ultimately reveals about the lonely old man I visited. I worked in hospice for six years, but it wasn’t until I moved on to another position that I was able to process some of these very intense experiences. One of the unique things about hospice is that it brings you into the patient’s environment, usually their home, and introduces you to the patient as part of a family system. This is a much different experience than seeing the isolated patient in the hospital or outpatient setting, because it allows a more holistic view, and insight into the dynamics, people, and places that have created the total person for whom you are caring. Seeing patients among their families, pets, and possessions offers an intimacy that is unique to home care. Many patients touched me deeply in hospice, and many images were indelibly printed on my psyche. The poem Third Visit illustrates one of the most powerful, yet simple images. A purse, hanging on a doorknob, is a highly evocative image, suggesting the presence of the owner, having hung it there momentarily, ready to be retrieved instantly as she walks out the door. The knowledge that this purse has remained there, untouched, by a lonely husband, for 26 years, is a poignant commentary on the difficulty of letting go, and the way we embody those who are now gone in the possessions they leave behind. My creativity is growing as I grow, and patients continually inspire me in ways both known, and unconscious. The greatest gift that hospice gave me was the knowledge that people exist in many worlds, and we may only see a tiny glimpse of the true being on a given visit. Hospice gave me time to really see the patient, in many ways; to perceive and appreciate all the glittering facets of a life, as it was preparing for a transformation. I keep this in mind in my daily work, and attempt to find out some small aspect of each patient’s everyday life in my encounters. A sideline from the photographer: I created this image for Karen's poem utilizing a door at the crisis counseling center where I used to volunteer. This historic home has been turned into a center where people come to find a safe place to explore their uncomfortable feelings openly, with the help of a compassionate listener. The house is old enough that the purse could really have been hung on that inner door long ago. I believe the spiritual assertion that feelings and thoughts are the mind's creations, mere reflections in the mirror of the mind, not reality itself. So the reflection of the image of the purse symbolizes the feelings the husband had associated with the purse for 26 years or longer. The brightness coming through the windows and bouncing into the mirror symbolizes both the wife's current state of being and Karen's caring for the widower, which brought the story out "into the light".
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThird Visiten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148283-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Third Visit</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roberts, Karen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Internal Medicine Group</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amazonratz@sunflower.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This poem is one of several reflections about my work as a hospice nurse. It is a very simple and short poem, about an old purse hanging on a doorknob, and what it ultimately reveals about the lonely old man I visited. I worked in hospice for six years, but it wasn&rsquo;t until I moved on to another position that I was able to process some of these very intense experiences. One of the unique things about hospice is that it brings you into the patient&rsquo;s environment, usually their home, and introduces you to the patient as part of a family system. This is a much different experience than seeing the isolated patient in the hospital or outpatient setting, because it allows a more holistic view, and insight into the dynamics, people, and places that have created the total person for whom you are caring. Seeing patients among their families, pets, and possessions offers an intimacy that is unique to home care. Many patients touched me deeply in hospice, and many images were indelibly printed on my psyche. The poem Third Visit illustrates one of the most powerful, yet simple images. A purse, hanging on a doorknob, is a highly evocative image, suggesting the presence of the owner, having hung it there momentarily, ready to be retrieved instantly as she walks out the door. The knowledge that this purse has remained there, untouched, by a lonely husband, for 26 years, is a poignant commentary on the difficulty of letting go, and the way we embody those who are now gone in the possessions they leave behind. My creativity is growing as I grow, and patients continually inspire me in ways both known, and unconscious. The greatest gift that hospice gave me was the knowledge that people exist in many worlds, and we may only see a tiny glimpse of the true being on a given visit. Hospice gave me time to really see the patient, in many ways; to perceive and appreciate all the glittering facets of a life, as it was preparing for a transformation. I keep this in mind in my daily work, and attempt to find out some small aspect of each patient&rsquo;s everyday life in my encounters. A sideline from the photographer: I created this image for Karen's poem utilizing a door at the crisis counseling center where I used to volunteer. This historic home has been turned into a center where people come to find a safe place to explore their uncomfortable feelings openly, with the help of a compassionate listener. The house is old enough that the purse could really have been hung on that inner door long ago. I believe the spiritual assertion that feelings and thoughts are the mind's creations, mere reflections in the mirror of the mind, not reality itself. So the reflection of the image of the purse symbolizes the feelings the husband had associated with the purse for 26 years or longer. The brightness coming through the windows and bouncing into the mirror symbolizes both the wife's current state of being and Karen's caring for the widower, which brought the story out &quot;into the light&quot;.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:54Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.