2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148286
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Use of Music to Promote Sleep in Older Women
Abstract:
The Use of Music to Promote Sleep in Older Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Johnson, Julie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada-Reno
Title:Director
Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of an individualized music protocol on time to sleep onset in older women with chronic insomnia. Design: A pre-test/post-test design was used. Sample: Names of potential participants were obtained from physicians and nurse practitioners. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established using the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. Ultimately, a convenience sample of 52 older women with a mean age of 80.5 years participated in the study. Setting: All participants lived in their homes and selected the music they wished to use in the study. Names of Variables or Concept: Key variables included the time to sleep onset before and after the use of music, the level of satisfaction with sleep before and after the use of music, and the level of satisfaction with the use of music to promote sleep onset. Measures/Instruments: Data were collected using and investigator constructed questionnaire. Test/re-test reliability and content validity were established prior to its use. Findings: Data were collected for 10 nights each in the pre- and post-test phases, and analyzed with t-tests and conceptual coding. Results showed that music significantly reduced time to sleep onset and increased level of satisfaction with sleep. Participants were very satisfied with the use of music. Conclusions: Music is useful in promoting sleep onset in older women with chronic insomnia. Implications: Nurses may wish to suggest that older women with chronic insomnia use music to enhance their sleep.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Use of Music to Promote Sleep in Older Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148286-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Use of Music to Promote Sleep in Older Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Julie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada-Reno</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jej@unr.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of an individualized music protocol on time to sleep onset in older women with chronic insomnia. Design: A pre-test/post-test design was used. Sample: Names of potential participants were obtained from physicians and nurse practitioners. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established using the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. Ultimately, a convenience sample of 52 older women with a mean age of 80.5 years participated in the study. Setting: All participants lived in their homes and selected the music they wished to use in the study. Names of Variables or Concept: Key variables included the time to sleep onset before and after the use of music, the level of satisfaction with sleep before and after the use of music, and the level of satisfaction with the use of music to promote sleep onset. Measures/Instruments: Data were collected using and investigator constructed questionnaire. Test/re-test reliability and content validity were established prior to its use. Findings: Data were collected for 10 nights each in the pre- and post-test phases, and analyzed with t-tests and conceptual coding. Results showed that music significantly reduced time to sleep onset and increased level of satisfaction with sleep. Participants were very satisfied with the use of music. Conclusions: Music is useful in promoting sleep onset in older women with chronic insomnia. Implications: Nurses may wish to suggest that older women with chronic insomnia use music to enhance their sleep.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:57Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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