Factors that Contribute to the Future Expectations of At-Risk Youth

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148287
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors that Contribute to the Future Expectations of At-Risk Youth
Abstract:
Factors that Contribute to the Future Expectations of At-Risk Youth
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Aronowitz, Teri
P.I. Institution Name:Syracuse University
Objective: To examine the role of connectedness and parental involvement to the future expectations of impoverished youth. Furthermore, the relationship of future expectations and resilience will be examined. Design: Secondary data analysis will be conducted on the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a nationally representative data set. Sample: The sample will consist of 1069 African American impoverished youth between the ages of 11-15 years obtained for the Wave I and Wave II in-home data collection. Variables: The two outcome variables of interest for this study are academic success and safer sexual behaviors. The latent variables of interest for this study are connectedness, parental involvement, depression and time perspective. Gender is included in the model for it is hypothesized that it moderates the relationship between parental involvement, connectedness and depression. Specifically that the relationship is stronger in females than among males. Methods: A longitudinal design, using latent variable structural equation modeling will be used to explore the association of connectedness, parental involvement, depression, time perspective and resilience in adolescents. Many of the same scales used by Resnick et al (1997), the original researchers of the Add Health dataset, will be employed in this study. Conclusions: Although it has been shown that there is an increase likelihood of youth participation in risk behaviors in impoverished neighborhoods (Garbarino, 1995), some youth remain resilient in these environments (Rutter, Maugham, Ouston, & Smoth, 1979; Werner & Smith, 1992). One of the important correlates to resilience in at-risk youth has been found to be a sense of connection to at least one caring, competent, reliable adult (Resnick, et al, 1998; Werner & Smith, 1992). It is hypothesized that it is the interactions within this connection that fosters future expectations, and that it is these future expectations that instill resilience in at-risk youth. Implications: Lack of future expectations has been associated with risk behaviors in late adolescence and young adulthood (Gilchrist & Schinke, 1987; Rothspan & Read, 1996), but this association has yet to be examined in young adolescents. The relationship between connectedness and future expectations has not been studied directly. This study will provide important information that can be used to further assess the mechanisms in which connectedness, future expectations and resilience are related.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors that Contribute to the Future Expectations of At-Risk Youthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148287-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors that Contribute to the Future Expectations of At-Risk Youth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Aronowitz, Teri</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Syracuse University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tbaronow@syr.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To examine the role of connectedness and parental involvement to the future expectations of impoverished youth. Furthermore, the relationship of future expectations and resilience will be examined. Design: Secondary data analysis will be conducted on the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a nationally representative data set. Sample: The sample will consist of 1069 African American impoverished youth between the ages of 11-15 years obtained for the Wave I and Wave II in-home data collection. Variables: The two outcome variables of interest for this study are academic success and safer sexual behaviors. The latent variables of interest for this study are connectedness, parental involvement, depression and time perspective. Gender is included in the model for it is hypothesized that it moderates the relationship between parental involvement, connectedness and depression. Specifically that the relationship is stronger in females than among males. Methods: A longitudinal design, using latent variable structural equation modeling will be used to explore the association of connectedness, parental involvement, depression, time perspective and resilience in adolescents. Many of the same scales used by Resnick et al (1997), the original researchers of the Add Health dataset, will be employed in this study. Conclusions: Although it has been shown that there is an increase likelihood of youth participation in risk behaviors in impoverished neighborhoods (Garbarino, 1995), some youth remain resilient in these environments (Rutter, Maugham, Ouston, &amp; Smoth, 1979; Werner &amp; Smith, 1992). One of the important correlates to resilience in at-risk youth has been found to be a sense of connection to at least one caring, competent, reliable adult (Resnick, et al, 1998; Werner &amp; Smith, 1992). It is hypothesized that it is the interactions within this connection that fosters future expectations, and that it is these future expectations that instill resilience in at-risk youth. Implications: Lack of future expectations has been associated with risk behaviors in late adolescence and young adulthood (Gilchrist &amp; Schinke, 1987; Rothspan &amp; Read, 1996), but this association has yet to be examined in young adolescents. The relationship between connectedness and future expectations has not been studied directly. This study will provide important information that can be used to further assess the mechanisms in which connectedness, future expectations and resilience are related.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:42:58Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:42:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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