Profiles of Self-Reported Adolescent HIV Risk Behaviors Among Young Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148294
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Profiles of Self-Reported Adolescent HIV Risk Behaviors Among Young Adults
Abstract:
Profiles of Self-Reported Adolescent HIV Risk Behaviors Among Young Adults
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Russell, Jan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Kansas City
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The objectives of this study were to: 1) identify behaviors which put adolescents at risk for HIV infection by retrospectively comparing a cohort of HIV positive and HIV negative young adults ages 20-25; and 2) determine gender high-risk profiles. Design: This is a comparative and correlational study. Sample: The sample comprised 61 HIV positive individuals drawn from two metropolitan areas in a single state and 123 HIV negative, but high risk, individuals drawn from a single setting. All sample subjects were 20-25 years of age. Setting: The HIV positive individuals were invited to participate in the research if they were receiving care in one hospital based clinic serving HIV clients, the health department, or one private practice in one city and in any one of five clinics who cared for HIV clients in the other city. The HIV negative individuals were drawn from one site comparable to the settings used for recruitment of positive subjects. These subjects had presented themselves to be tested at one site in one city and were found to be negative. Names of Variables or Concept: The concepts are: HIV Seropositive, Risk Factors, and Adolescence. Measures/Instrument: The investigators developed a written survey when a review of the literature failed to yield a comprehensive tool. The survey examined six areas of behavior which have been related to HIV: alcohol use, illicit drug use, tobacco use, sexual practices, gang involvement, and sexual practices prior to the age of 12. The resulting instrument, which was patterned after the Adolescent Alcohol Involvement Scale (AAIS), was 43 multiple-choice questions representing the six areas. In addition to this, a demographic instrument was developed to describe the sample and to provide additional potential predictors of risk behaviors. The content validity of the instrument was rooted in the selection of risk areas and risk behaviors from current research literature in the area of adolescent risk behaviors, and risk taking. Concurrent validity of the alcohol use items was assumed given the construction of the items being parallel to the AAIS, an instrument of established reliability and validity. Findings: Smoking, drinking, illicit drug use, and intravenous drug use are not shown to be more prevalent in the HIV positive group than negative. For both positive men and women, high-risk sexual behaviors were the significant predictors of their HIV status. For men, the high-risk behaviors were: being sexually abused before the age of 12 (30%), unprotected sex at an early age, high numbers of sexual partners, anal intercourse, group sex and sado-masochistic sex. For women, the sole high-risk behavior was unprotected vaginal intercourse at early ages. Conclusions: 1) Smoking, drinking, drugs, and gang behaviors were not supported by this research as predictive of HIV sero-status in this cohort. 2) When both genders were considered, early and unprotected sexual behaviors were the only reliable predictors of HIV status. 3) HIV risk profiles are different for adolescent girls and boys. Implications: 1) Prevention in the area of unprotected sex is a critical element for both boys and girls. 2) Society needs to concentrate on protecting its boys from sexual abuse as much as girls. 3) There is an increase in young gay males engaging in high-risk activity; therefore constant education in all sub-cultures of society is critical. 4) Even though illicit drugs was not predictive of HIV status in this study, there was high drug use in both groups. Therefore, continued action to reduce and or eliminate illicit drug use is important. 5) Replicate this study with larger groups.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProfiles of Self-Reported Adolescent HIV Risk Behaviors Among Young Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148294-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Profiles of Self-Reported Adolescent HIV Risk Behaviors Among Young Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Russell, Jan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Kansas City</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">russelj@umkc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objectives of this study were to: 1) identify behaviors which put adolescents at risk for HIV infection by retrospectively comparing a cohort of HIV positive and HIV negative young adults ages 20-25; and 2) determine gender high-risk profiles. Design: This is a comparative and correlational study. Sample: The sample comprised 61 HIV positive individuals drawn from two metropolitan areas in a single state and 123 HIV negative, but high risk, individuals drawn from a single setting. All sample subjects were 20-25 years of age. Setting: The HIV positive individuals were invited to participate in the research if they were receiving care in one hospital based clinic serving HIV clients, the health department, or one private practice in one city and in any one of five clinics who cared for HIV clients in the other city. The HIV negative individuals were drawn from one site comparable to the settings used for recruitment of positive subjects. These subjects had presented themselves to be tested at one site in one city and were found to be negative. Names of Variables or Concept: The concepts are: HIV Seropositive, Risk Factors, and Adolescence. Measures/Instrument: The investigators developed a written survey when a review of the literature failed to yield a comprehensive tool. The survey examined six areas of behavior which have been related to HIV: alcohol use, illicit drug use, tobacco use, sexual practices, gang involvement, and sexual practices prior to the age of 12. The resulting instrument, which was patterned after the Adolescent Alcohol Involvement Scale (AAIS), was 43 multiple-choice questions representing the six areas. In addition to this, a demographic instrument was developed to describe the sample and to provide additional potential predictors of risk behaviors. The content validity of the instrument was rooted in the selection of risk areas and risk behaviors from current research literature in the area of adolescent risk behaviors, and risk taking. Concurrent validity of the alcohol use items was assumed given the construction of the items being parallel to the AAIS, an instrument of established reliability and validity. Findings: Smoking, drinking, illicit drug use, and intravenous drug use are not shown to be more prevalent in the HIV positive group than negative. For both positive men and women, high-risk sexual behaviors were the significant predictors of their HIV status. For men, the high-risk behaviors were: being sexually abused before the age of 12 (30%), unprotected sex at an early age, high numbers of sexual partners, anal intercourse, group sex and sado-masochistic sex. For women, the sole high-risk behavior was unprotected vaginal intercourse at early ages. Conclusions: 1) Smoking, drinking, drugs, and gang behaviors were not supported by this research as predictive of HIV sero-status in this cohort. 2) When both genders were considered, early and unprotected sexual behaviors were the only reliable predictors of HIV status. 3) HIV risk profiles are different for adolescent girls and boys. Implications: 1) Prevention in the area of unprotected sex is a critical element for both boys and girls. 2) Society needs to concentrate on protecting its boys from sexual abuse as much as girls. 3) There is an increase in young gay males engaging in high-risk activity; therefore constant education in all sub-cultures of society is critical. 4) Even though illicit drugs was not predictive of HIV status in this study, there was high drug use in both groups. Therefore, continued action to reduce and or eliminate illicit drug use is important. 5) Replicate this study with larger groups.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:04Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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