2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148297
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Negotiating health care reform: Nurses’ lived experience
Abstract:
Negotiating health care reform: Nurses’ lived experience
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Moffett, Barbara
P.I. Institution Name:Southeastern Louisiana University
Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of health care redesign on nursing practice and the approaches nurses use to negotiate change in the environment of health care redesign. Design: A phenomenological approach was used to collect data concerning the lived experience of nurses who have experienced job changes as a result of redesign in the workplace. Sample: Ten nurses were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Data analysis was completed using a modified Calaizzi (1978) approach to identify themes in the data. Findings: Four key themes emerged from the data: (1) role diffusion, (2) loss of voice, (3) conflict with caring values, and (4) negotiating loss. The struggle of re-defining roles was evident in all the interviews. Many felt that traditional roles have been redefined without their input. Most indicate concerns that tasks are being delegated to unqualified personnel and care to patients is fragmented. The nurses also perceive that their concerns about patient care are often not heard. Several mentioned poor communication between management and staff nurses and suggested that decisions are made without regard to quality care or staff workload and morale. Participants were very concerned about a reduction in time available for teaching and meeting emotional needs of clients. The nurses expressed that quality and safety are often compromised in an effort to care for increasing numbers of sicker patients in less time and with fewer resources. The theme of negotiating loss evolved as nurses reported their responses to struggles with changes in delivery of care. Conclusion: A variety of coping strategies ranging from use of short-term survival skills to well-formulated decisions with long-term implications were evident. A sense of loss permeated each of the identified themes. Implications: Many nurses perceived loss of voice, loss of traditional roles and loss of caring nurse-client relationships as a result of changes associated with health care reform and struggled to negotiate effective resolution. Understanding this phenomenon in the context of grief and loss can be useful in assisting nurses with development of effective coping strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNegotiating health care reform: Nurses’ lived experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148297-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Negotiating health care reform: Nurses&rsquo; lived experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moffett, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southeastern Louisiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bmoffett@selu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of health care redesign on nursing practice and the approaches nurses use to negotiate change in the environment of health care redesign. Design: A phenomenological approach was used to collect data concerning the lived experience of nurses who have experienced job changes as a result of redesign in the workplace. Sample: Ten nurses were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Data analysis was completed using a modified Calaizzi (1978) approach to identify themes in the data. Findings: Four key themes emerged from the data: (1) role diffusion, (2) loss of voice, (3) conflict with caring values, and (4) negotiating loss. The struggle of re-defining roles was evident in all the interviews. Many felt that traditional roles have been redefined without their input. Most indicate concerns that tasks are being delegated to unqualified personnel and care to patients is fragmented. The nurses also perceive that their concerns about patient care are often not heard. Several mentioned poor communication between management and staff nurses and suggested that decisions are made without regard to quality care or staff workload and morale. Participants were very concerned about a reduction in time available for teaching and meeting emotional needs of clients. The nurses expressed that quality and safety are often compromised in an effort to care for increasing numbers of sicker patients in less time and with fewer resources. The theme of negotiating loss evolved as nurses reported their responses to struggles with changes in delivery of care. Conclusion: A variety of coping strategies ranging from use of short-term survival skills to well-formulated decisions with long-term implications were evident. A sense of loss permeated each of the identified themes. Implications: Many nurses perceived loss of voice, loss of traditional roles and loss of caring nurse-client relationships as a result of changes associated with health care reform and struggled to negotiate effective resolution. Understanding this phenomenon in the context of grief and loss can be useful in assisting nurses with development of effective coping strategies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:07Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.