Self Efficacy, Outcome Expectancy and Exercise Among Patients with Heart Failure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148302
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self Efficacy, Outcome Expectancy and Exercise Among Patients with Heart Failure
Abstract:
Self Efficacy, Outcome Expectancy and Exercise Among Patients with Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Barr, Joan
P.I. Institution Name:Clarian Health, Methodist Hospital
Background: Heart failure (HF) is an increasingly prevalent disease with nearly five million Americans currently living with this condition, 4000,000 new cases diagnosed annually, and 250,000 deaths attributed to HF each year (American Heart Association, 1999). Heart Failure is also associated with limitation of activity and reduced quality of life (Konstam et al., 1994) with an annual cost of 10 billion dollars (Konstam et al., 1996). The Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research (1994) specifically recommends regular exercise such as walking for the management of HF. However, little is known about factors that effect the behavior of regular exercise among patients with HF. Objective: To determine if self-efficacy (SE) and outcome expectancy (OE) for walking are factors which are related to the self care behavior of walking among patients with HF. The theoretical framework utilized for this study was Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory (1986). Methods: A non-experimental descriptive study was conducted to measure the relationships among SE, OE and exercise participation among patients with HF. A convenience sample of 30 hospitalized HF patients who received the hospital program that included walking recommendations from Cardiac Rehabilitation were recruited with SE and OE measured at time of discharge and again two weeks after discharge. Time spent walking during the two week time period after discharge was self-reported. Pearson correlation was used to measure the degree of association. Findings: Although Pearson correlation approached statistical significance (r=0.33; p=0.05), it was not significant for this sample. Reliability of the Cardiac Exercise Self-efficacy Instrument (Hickey, Owen & Fromen, 1992) for this sample was alpha =0.87. A newly developed instrument to measure OE resulted in a reliability with this sample of alpha =0.77. A post hoc examination of the relationship between SE and OE was examined which resulted in a significant correlation (r=0.64). This supported the theoretical constructs of this study. Seventy-six percent of the sample reported 70% or more compliance with the recommended home walking program. Both SE and OE scores were quite high with an average of 4.1 and 4.2 respectively (out of a possible score of 5.0). Approximately 9% of the variance for exercise was explained with SE. Conclusions: 1)SE and OE appear to explain a modest percent of variance for exercise among patients with HF; 2) Sample bias (60% of the sample were adherent to walking prior to hospitalization and all patients in this sample received cardiac rehabilitation) and/or sample size may have contributed to constriction of data elements resulting in non-significant statistical results. The percent of variance for exercise explained by SE is consistent with other research studies utilizing multiple regression in which 8-20% of exercise variability has been explained with SE in cardiac patient populations (Allen et al., 1990, Ewart et al., 1983, & Gortner and Jenkins, 1990); 3) more research is needed to determine other predictors for walking behavior among patients with HF. ( 44 ref).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf Efficacy, Outcome Expectancy and Exercise Among Patients with Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148302-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self Efficacy, Outcome Expectancy and Exercise Among Patients with Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barr, Joan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Clarian Health, Methodist Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbarr@clarian.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Heart failure (HF) is an increasingly prevalent disease with nearly five million Americans currently living with this condition, 4000,000 new cases diagnosed annually, and 250,000 deaths attributed to HF each year (American Heart Association, 1999). Heart Failure is also associated with limitation of activity and reduced quality of life (Konstam et al., 1994) with an annual cost of 10 billion dollars (Konstam et al., 1996). The Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research (1994) specifically recommends regular exercise such as walking for the management of HF. However, little is known about factors that effect the behavior of regular exercise among patients with HF. Objective: To determine if self-efficacy (SE) and outcome expectancy (OE) for walking are factors which are related to the self care behavior of walking among patients with HF. The theoretical framework utilized for this study was Bandura&rsquo;s Social Cognitive Theory (1986). Methods: A non-experimental descriptive study was conducted to measure the relationships among SE, OE and exercise participation among patients with HF. A convenience sample of 30 hospitalized HF patients who received the hospital program that included walking recommendations from Cardiac Rehabilitation were recruited with SE and OE measured at time of discharge and again two weeks after discharge. Time spent walking during the two week time period after discharge was self-reported. Pearson correlation was used to measure the degree of association. Findings: Although Pearson correlation approached statistical significance (r=0.33; p=0.05), it was not significant for this sample. Reliability of the Cardiac Exercise Self-efficacy Instrument (Hickey, Owen &amp; Fromen, 1992) for this sample was alpha =0.87. A newly developed instrument to measure OE resulted in a reliability with this sample of alpha =0.77. A post hoc examination of the relationship between SE and OE was examined which resulted in a significant correlation (r=0.64). This supported the theoretical constructs of this study. Seventy-six percent of the sample reported 70% or more compliance with the recommended home walking program. Both SE and OE scores were quite high with an average of 4.1 and 4.2 respectively (out of a possible score of 5.0). Approximately 9% of the variance for exercise was explained with SE. Conclusions: 1)SE and OE appear to explain a modest percent of variance for exercise among patients with HF; 2) Sample bias (60% of the sample were adherent to walking prior to hospitalization and all patients in this sample received cardiac rehabilitation) and/or sample size may have contributed to constriction of data elements resulting in non-significant statistical results. The percent of variance for exercise explained by SE is consistent with other research studies utilizing multiple regression in which 8-20% of exercise variability has been explained with SE in cardiac patient populations (Allen et al., 1990, Ewart et al., 1983, &amp; Gortner and Jenkins, 1990); 3) more research is needed to determine other predictors for walking behavior among patients with HF. ( 44 ref).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:12Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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