2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148310
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health promotion and burnout in nurses
Abstract:
Health promotion and burnout in nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Maloney, Judith
P.I. Institution Name:SUNY Upstate Medical University
This descriptive, correlational study assess the relationship between health-promoting behaviors and burnout among 182 female nurses in a 260-bed community hospital in rural northern New York. It is postulated that good health-promoting behaviors help decrease burnout among nurses. Pender’s Health Promotion Model is the theoretical framework underlying this study. The Health-promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP II) and Maslach’s Burnout Inventory questionnaires were used to assess health-promoting behaviors and burnout. Pearson Product-Moment Correlation was used to correlate the HPLP II and the MBI-HSS and their subscales. It was found that a strong, significant correlation existed between good health-promoting behaviors and the degree of burnout (Emotional Exhaustion - .274, p < .01, Depersonalization - .180 p < .05, Personal Accomplishment .482, p< .01). Generalization to a larger urban hospital, or tertiary care hospital might be limited. However, the strength of this study is that nurses do suffer a moderately high degree of burnout, and go9od health-promoting behaviors may be able to alleviate it. Nursing administrators and employee health nurses in hospitals might be encouraged to look for signs of burnout among their staff and to foster health-promotion programs. Thus, the staff might suffer less burnout, and patients would be more satisfied with the quality of their nursing care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth promotion and burnout in nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148310-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health promotion and burnout in nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Maloney, Judith</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">SUNY Upstate Medical University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maloneyj@twcny.rr.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This descriptive, correlational study assess the relationship between health-promoting behaviors and burnout among 182 female nurses in a 260-bed community hospital in rural northern New York. It is postulated that good health-promoting behaviors help decrease burnout among nurses. Pender&rsquo;s Health Promotion Model is the theoretical framework underlying this study. The Health-promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP II) and Maslach&rsquo;s Burnout Inventory questionnaires were used to assess health-promoting behaviors and burnout. Pearson Product-Moment Correlation was used to correlate the HPLP II and the MBI-HSS and their subscales. It was found that a strong, significant correlation existed between good health-promoting behaviors and the degree of burnout (Emotional Exhaustion - .274, p &lt; .01, Depersonalization - .180 p &lt; .05, Personal Accomplishment .482, p&lt; .01). Generalization to a larger urban hospital, or tertiary care hospital might be limited. However, the strength of this study is that nurses do suffer a moderately high degree of burnout, and go9od health-promoting behaviors may be able to alleviate it. Nursing administrators and employee health nurses in hospitals might be encouraged to look for signs of burnout among their staff and to foster health-promotion programs. Thus, the staff might suffer less burnout, and patients would be more satisfied with the quality of their nursing care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:19Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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