The Influence of Thermal Head and Feet Support on Early Stage Weight Gain in Premature Neonates in Korea

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148317
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Thermal Head and Feet Support on Early Stage Weight Gain in Premature Neonates in Korea
Abstract:
The Influence of Thermal Head and Feet Support on Early Stage Weight Gain in Premature Neonates in Korea
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Sung, Mi-Hae
P.I. Institution Name:Inje University
Title:Assistant Professor
Immaturity due to the short gestational period contributes to defects in growth and development and these differences in development are not generally found at the end of 2 years, if no any factors. Until recently there were studies that showed that body temperature in newborns were changed through thermal head support, however, little study has been conducted on weight change in newborns through thermal body support. The purpose of this study is to find a method that shows weight gain due to less consumption of energy by putting cap and socks on the head and feet to give thermal support. This study is a quasi experimental study by a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design to identify how the thermal head and feet supportive nursing intervention influences weight gain in premature neonates. Subjects were selected among the premature infants with a weight of under 2000gms, admitted (to the NICU) in K university hospital, Seoul, Korea. The control group of 29 was selected from January 1999 to August 1999, from those who were without head and feet thermal support, and the experimental group of 30 was selected from September 1999 to May 2000, from those who were with the two thermal interventions. I used 2 clinical reports of infants selected from January 1999 to August 1999( the control group) and infants selected from September 1999 to May 2000, who were with the two thermal interventions(the experimental group) as analysis instruments. The gird used for recording the weights of preterm infants divided the weights of 500-3200gm into 55 sections in 50gms in length and divided birth dates of 1-50 days into 50 sections in 1 day in width and indicated weights and birth dates with a solid line. Accordingly, PC-SPSS program was used to perform the statistical analysis of the collected data. For testing the homogeneity between the experimental group and the control group, X2-test was used in general characteristics. The result was that statistical differences in all characteristics were not significant; therefore the 2 groups were homogeneous. The result was that differences in weight gain per day over a period of 15 days between the 2 groups were statistically significant (F=2306.224, p<.000). Also, differences in weight gain per day of 2 groups between periods were significant (F=37.559, p<.000) and reciprocal action between the 2 groups and periods showed statistically significant difference(F=2.692, p<.001). The result was that statistical differences in weight loss during 9 days between 2 groups were significant (F=2302.520, p<.000). Also, differences between the periods of the 2 groups were significant (F=60.778, p<.000). The results showed that differences between the 2 groups (F=2118.979, p<.000) and differences between the periods(F=48.184, p=.000) were statistically significant, however, significant differences were not found in reciprocal action between the 2 groups and the periods(F=1.002, p=.731). Therefore hypothesis 3 was rejected.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Thermal Head and Feet Support on Early Stage Weight Gain in Premature Neonates in Koreaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148317-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Influence of Thermal Head and Feet Support on Early Stage Weight Gain in Premature Neonates in Korea</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sung, Mi-Hae</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Inje University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nursmh@ijnc.inje.ac.kr</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Immaturity due to the short gestational period contributes to defects in growth and development and these differences in development are not generally found at the end of 2 years, if no any factors. Until recently there were studies that showed that body temperature in newborns were changed through thermal head support, however, little study has been conducted on weight change in newborns through thermal body support. The purpose of this study is to find a method that shows weight gain due to less consumption of energy by putting cap and socks on the head and feet to give thermal support. This study is a quasi experimental study by a nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design to identify how the thermal head and feet supportive nursing intervention influences weight gain in premature neonates. Subjects were selected among the premature infants with a weight of under 2000gms, admitted (to the NICU) in K university hospital, Seoul, Korea. The control group of 29 was selected from January 1999 to August 1999, from those who were without head and feet thermal support, and the experimental group of 30 was selected from September 1999 to May 2000, from those who were with the two thermal interventions. I used 2 clinical reports of infants selected from January 1999 to August 1999( the control group) and infants selected from September 1999 to May 2000, who were with the two thermal interventions(the experimental group) as analysis instruments. The gird used for recording the weights of preterm infants divided the weights of 500-3200gm into 55 sections in 50gms in length and divided birth dates of 1-50 days into 50 sections in 1 day in width and indicated weights and birth dates with a solid line. Accordingly, PC-SPSS program was used to perform the statistical analysis of the collected data. For testing the homogeneity between the experimental group and the control group, X2-test was used in general characteristics. The result was that statistical differences in all characteristics were not significant; therefore the 2 groups were homogeneous. The result was that differences in weight gain per day over a period of 15 days between the 2 groups were statistically significant (F=2306.224, p&lt;.000). Also, differences in weight gain per day of 2 groups between periods were significant (F=37.559, p&lt;.000) and reciprocal action between the 2 groups and periods showed statistically significant difference(F=2.692, p&lt;.001). The result was that statistical differences in weight loss during 9 days between 2 groups were significant (F=2302.520, p&lt;.000). Also, differences between the periods of the 2 groups were significant (F=60.778, p&lt;.000). The results showed that differences between the 2 groups (F=2118.979, p&lt;.000) and differences between the periods(F=48.184, p=.000) were statistically significant, however, significant differences were not found in reciprocal action between the 2 groups and the periods(F=1.002, p=.731). Therefore hypothesis 3 was rejected.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:25Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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