2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148318
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collaborative Orientation
Abstract:
Collaborative Orientation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Fetsch, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Avila College
Title:
This Best Practices project on Collaborative Orientation was designed as an effort to share an orientation agreement between education and practice settings that would a) avoid duplication of orientation efforts, b) provide a curricular model for orientation, and c) result in increased efficiency and collaboration for the orientation of nursing students entering acute care settings. The purposes of this project on collaborative orientation were to: Analyze and synthesize orientation related regulatory standards, Compare the effectiveness of computer and other teaching methodologies in the orientation process, Develop an orientation curriculum model for use in acute care settings, and Compare the orientation competency of students and newly hired staff nurses. The initial effort in this project was a comparative analysis of an existing orientation manual with regulatory orientation standards from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), and Medicare. Using HyperRESEARCH software, the comparative analysis showed that the regulatory documents included some topics that the orientation manual did not. This information was reviewed with Kansas City metropolitan area clinical education coordinators and revisions were made based on recommendations. In addition, forms for student, teacher, and staff nurse evaluation of the clinical education experience were revised and the manual was edited to make it generic for any health care professional or student, not just nursing students. A wallet sized "Nursing Student Orientation Competency" card was designed for schools to distribute to nursing students when they have passed the orientation competency exam with scores of 90% or better. Following the revision of the orientation manual, the manual was made accessible via hotlink. Participants were selected from the area schools (11) and agencies (13) who either waived or obtained institutional research review approval. Six agencies were invited to represent a variety of institutional settings; all 11 schools were invited to participate. Ultimately, eight schools (student n = 347) and three agencies (employee n = 11) provided data on competency exam scores. The schools also provided data on learning strategy implementation. Average post-orientation competency scores were higher for agencies and all but one school when compared to pre-orientation competency score averages. Students had higher post-orientation competency scores than employees. A one-way analysis of variance and Scheffe post-hoc testing indicates there is no statistically significant difference in post-orientation competency scores between a) mixed and self-study learning strategies (p = .925) or b) classroom and computer learning strategies (p = .938). However, statistically significant differences in post-orientation competency scores occurred: a) mixed over class (p = .035), b) mixed over computer (p = .001), c) self-study over class (p = .032), and d) self-study over computer (p = .003). The results of this project indicate that the nursing student orientation model is an effective orientation method for nursing students. An agency that welcomes student clinical experiences can be confident that the orientation students are receiving is meeting regulatory expectations. Schools and agencies may want to consider what strategies will be most effective for learning in their environments—perhaps emphasizing self-study or a mix of the learning strategies. In addition, they may expand its use to non-nursing students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollaborative Orientationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148318-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Collaborative Orientation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fetsch, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Avila College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fetschsh@mail.avila.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This Best Practices project on Collaborative Orientation was designed as an effort to share an orientation agreement between education and practice settings that would a) avoid duplication of orientation efforts, b) provide a curricular model for orientation, and c) result in increased efficiency and collaboration for the orientation of nursing students entering acute care settings. The purposes of this project on collaborative orientation were to: Analyze and synthesize orientation related regulatory standards, Compare the effectiveness of computer and other teaching methodologies in the orientation process, Develop an orientation curriculum model for use in acute care settings, and Compare the orientation competency of students and newly hired staff nurses. The initial effort in this project was a comparative analysis of an existing orientation manual with regulatory orientation standards from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), and Medicare. Using HyperRESEARCH software, the comparative analysis showed that the regulatory documents included some topics that the orientation manual did not. This information was reviewed with Kansas City metropolitan area clinical education coordinators and revisions were made based on recommendations. In addition, forms for student, teacher, and staff nurse evaluation of the clinical education experience were revised and the manual was edited to make it generic for any health care professional or student, not just nursing students. A wallet sized &quot;Nursing Student Orientation Competency&quot; card was designed for schools to distribute to nursing students when they have passed the orientation competency exam with scores of 90% or better. Following the revision of the orientation manual, the manual was made accessible via hotlink. Participants were selected from the area schools (11) and agencies (13) who either waived or obtained institutional research review approval. Six agencies were invited to represent a variety of institutional settings; all 11 schools were invited to participate. Ultimately, eight schools (student n = 347) and three agencies (employee n = 11) provided data on competency exam scores. The schools also provided data on learning strategy implementation. Average post-orientation competency scores were higher for agencies and all but one school when compared to pre-orientation competency score averages. Students had higher post-orientation competency scores than employees. A one-way analysis of variance and Scheffe post-hoc testing indicates there is no statistically significant difference in post-orientation competency scores between a) mixed and self-study learning strategies (p = .925) or b) classroom and computer learning strategies (p = .938). However, statistically significant differences in post-orientation competency scores occurred: a) mixed over class (p = .035), b) mixed over computer (p = .001), c) self-study over class (p = .032), and d) self-study over computer (p = .003). The results of this project indicate that the nursing student orientation model is an effective orientation method for nursing students. An agency that welcomes student clinical experiences can be confident that the orientation students are receiving is meeting regulatory expectations. Schools and agencies may want to consider what strategies will be most effective for learning in their environments&mdash;perhaps emphasizing self-study or a mix of the learning strategies. In addition, they may expand its use to non-nursing students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:26Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.