2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148323
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based Skin and Wound Care: Pieces of the Puzzle
Abstract:
Evidence-Based Skin and Wound Care: Pieces of the Puzzle
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Andrychuk, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:Drake Center, Inc.
Pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and wound healing promotion are activities strongly associated with nursing care. Among hospitalized patients, PU prevalence rates are reported between 3.5 and 29.5%. Among nursing home residents, PU prevalence rates are reported between 2.4-23%. Certain subpopulations, such as the spinal cord injured, orthopaedic and critical care patients have reported PU prevalence rates from 33 – 66%. Incorporation of current evidence and best practice information is vital to a successful pressure ulcer prevention and treatment program in any setting. To improve the quality of skin and wound care at a 356-bed long term acute care, rehabilitation and skilled nursing facility, a Wound Care Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) initiated the process to incorporate evidence-based practice related to skin and wound care. Opportunities identified by the CNS included, but were not limited to: 1. No evidence-based Skin/Wound Care Protocols in place to guide practice. 2. Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Tool not a valid nor reliable instrument. 3. Pressure Ulcer Flow Sheet allowed variation and inconsistencies in documentation. 4. Standardized Plans of Care for Skin/Wound Management did not exist. 5. Wound Care Product Formulary could be enhanced. 6. Guidelines for Specialty Bed Usage did not exist. Following assessment, the Wound Care CNS, in collaboration with others throughout the system, began to integrate the issues related to skin/wound care and to plan changes to address opportunities identified. The foundation of the CNS’s work was research-based evidence, particularly the AHCPR guidelines. For each recommendation, the AHCPR guidelines provide strength of evidence information, the greatest of which is results from two or more randomized controlled clinical trials, the least of which is expert opinion. In addition to the AHCPR guidelines, best practice information or standards from various specialty organizations (such as National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Wound Ostomy Continence Nurses Society) were utilized. This presentation will utilize Rosswurm’s Model for Evidence-Based Practice (1999) to discuss one piece of the skin/wound puzzle, evidence-based protocol development. The presentation will also identify which pieces of the skin/wound care puzzle still need to be placed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based Skin and Wound Care: Pieces of the Puzzleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148323-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence-Based Skin and Wound Care: Pieces of the Puzzle</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Andrychuk, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Drake Center, Inc.</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and wound healing promotion are activities strongly associated with nursing care. Among hospitalized patients, PU prevalence rates are reported between 3.5 and 29.5%. Among nursing home residents, PU prevalence rates are reported between 2.4-23%. Certain subpopulations, such as the spinal cord injured, orthopaedic and critical care patients have reported PU prevalence rates from 33 &ndash; 66%. Incorporation of current evidence and best practice information is vital to a successful pressure ulcer prevention and treatment program in any setting. To improve the quality of skin and wound care at a 356-bed long term acute care, rehabilitation and skilled nursing facility, a Wound Care Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) initiated the process to incorporate evidence-based practice related to skin and wound care. Opportunities identified by the CNS included, but were not limited to: 1. No evidence-based Skin/Wound Care Protocols in place to guide practice. 2. Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Tool not a valid nor reliable instrument. 3. Pressure Ulcer Flow Sheet allowed variation and inconsistencies in documentation. 4. Standardized Plans of Care for Skin/Wound Management did not exist. 5. Wound Care Product Formulary could be enhanced. 6. Guidelines for Specialty Bed Usage did not exist. Following assessment, the Wound Care CNS, in collaboration with others throughout the system, began to integrate the issues related to skin/wound care and to plan changes to address opportunities identified. The foundation of the CNS&rsquo;s work was research-based evidence, particularly the AHCPR guidelines. For each recommendation, the AHCPR guidelines provide strength of evidence information, the greatest of which is results from two or more randomized controlled clinical trials, the least of which is expert opinion. In addition to the AHCPR guidelines, best practice information or standards from various specialty organizations (such as National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Wound Ostomy Continence Nurses Society) were utilized. This presentation will utilize Rosswurm&rsquo;s Model for Evidence-Based Practice (1999) to discuss one piece of the skin/wound puzzle, evidence-based protocol development. The presentation will also identify which pieces of the skin/wound care puzzle still need to be placed. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:30Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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