Concept identification and development as a means of historical event analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148333
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Concept identification and development as a means of historical event analysis
Abstract:
Concept identification and development as a means of historical event analysis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Selanders, Louise
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
As early as 1913, Florence Nightingale was described as the “founder of modern nursing” (Cook, 1913). By definition, the term “founder” implies that Nightingale was the initiator, creator or originator of nursing in its current context. In fact, nursing existed in many forms, educated and uneducated, prior to and during Nightingale’s lifetime. Therefore, it was appropriate that alternate terminology be identified and validated which more accurately describes Nightingale’s contribution to the profession. The purpose of this project is to describe the process of concept development and the possible determination of its current relevance to nursing practice, education and research. Through a process of vocabulary review, the term “foundational philosopher” was determined to most accurately describe Nightingale’s contribution to nursing. As a means of beginning to validate this new terminology as well as clarify the definition, a concept analysis as described by Walker and Avant (1995) was completed. As a part of this process, it was necessary to determine and cross reference assumptions carried by Nightingale which served as a basis of her perception of nursing as a profession. This was completed through an extensive review of primary documents extending from 1845-1895 with the bulk of these papers originating from 1850-1876. This investigation revealed a series of assumptions held by Nightingale in three distinct areas: 1.) the general nature of nursing, 2.) nursing education and 3.) nursing research. Each assumption was documented from the primary literature. As a secondary analysis, each assumption was reviewed for its application to the current status of nursing, nursing education and nursing research. Each was found to have current relevance, indicating that the basic assumptions laid out by Nightingale in the 19th century continue to have utility to modern nursing. Long term applicability to a social institution is implicit in the definition of “foundational philosopher”. There are several conclusions which can be drawn from this project. Although not commonly used as a part of historical research, concept identification and development can be a useful tool in the clarification and analysis of historical events. Additionally, this project has been able to significantly add to the body of literature which identifies the current utility of Nightingale’s philosophical beliefs on the development of modern nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConcept identification and development as a means of historical event analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148333-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Concept identification and development as a means of historical event analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Selanders, Louise</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">selander@msu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As early as 1913, Florence Nightingale was described as the &ldquo;founder of modern nursing&rdquo; (Cook, 1913). By definition, the term &ldquo;founder&rdquo; implies that Nightingale was the initiator, creator or originator of nursing in its current context. In fact, nursing existed in many forms, educated and uneducated, prior to and during Nightingale&rsquo;s lifetime. Therefore, it was appropriate that alternate terminology be identified and validated which more accurately describes Nightingale&rsquo;s contribution to the profession. The purpose of this project is to describe the process of concept development and the possible determination of its current relevance to nursing practice, education and research. Through a process of vocabulary review, the term &ldquo;foundational philosopher&rdquo; was determined to most accurately describe Nightingale&rsquo;s contribution to nursing. As a means of beginning to validate this new terminology as well as clarify the definition, a concept analysis as described by Walker and Avant (1995) was completed. As a part of this process, it was necessary to determine and cross reference assumptions carried by Nightingale which served as a basis of her perception of nursing as a profession. This was completed through an extensive review of primary documents extending from 1845-1895 with the bulk of these papers originating from 1850-1876. This investigation revealed a series of assumptions held by Nightingale in three distinct areas: 1.) the general nature of nursing, 2.) nursing education and 3.) nursing research. Each assumption was documented from the primary literature. As a secondary analysis, each assumption was reviewed for its application to the current status of nursing, nursing education and nursing research. Each was found to have current relevance, indicating that the basic assumptions laid out by Nightingale in the 19th century continue to have utility to modern nursing. Long term applicability to a social institution is implicit in the definition of &ldquo;foundational philosopher&rdquo;. There are several conclusions which can be drawn from this project. Although not commonly used as a part of historical research, concept identification and development can be a useful tool in the clarification and analysis of historical events. Additionally, this project has been able to significantly add to the body of literature which identifies the current utility of Nightingale&rsquo;s philosophical beliefs on the development of modern nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:38Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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