The effect of two different types of strength training on joint pain and functional ability among individuals with osteoarthritis of the knee

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148341
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effect of two different types of strength training on joint pain and functional ability among individuals with osteoarthritis of the knee
Abstract:
The effect of two different types of strength training on joint pain and functional ability among individuals with osteoarthritis of the knee
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Topp, Robert, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Georgia
Title:Associate Dean for Research
Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common, progressive health problems among adults. It is estimated that 80% of all adults age 65 years and older exhibit radiographic evidence of OA. A majority of these adults have OA related pain which is thought to contribute to 10-25% of all visits to primary care physicians. Furthermore, when symptoms of the disease affect the knee, as in 10% of all adults, it results in a limited ability to complete activities of daily living. Previous observational studies have indicated a significant relationship between measures of declines in physical fitness and declines in functional ability. A limited number of investigators have demonstrated diverse exercise interventions can decrease self- reports of joint pain and increase self-reported functional ability among OA patients. No study has yet compared dynamic versus isometric strength training on the actual performance of functional activities or the joint pain while performing these activities among patients with OA of the knee. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of 16 weeks of isometric versus dynamic strength training versus a control condition on knee pain and functional abilities among adults with knee OA. A total of 102 subjects with a documented diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the knee were randomized into one of three groups and completed a 16-week protocol. Prior to randomization and following 16 weeks of their respective group intervention each subject completed an assessment of their knee pain and functional ability. Functional ability was assessed as the shortest duration in seconds of three trials to complete each of four functional tasks. These tasks included descending and ascending a flight of 27 stairs and transferring from a standing to a supine position on the floor and transferring from a supine position on the floor to standing upright. Pain was assessed by asking the subject to indicate the degree of pain in their knees using a visual analog scale immediately following performing each of the four functional tasks. Functional ability and pain were also assessed through self-reported using the WOMAC and MOS-36 paper and pencil assessment tools. The 35 subjects who were randomized to the dynamic strength training group (dynamic group) performed six different dynamic strength training exercises involving the hip, knee and ankle, using TheraBand® elastic bands to generate resistance, three times per week for 16 weeks. The 32 subjects who were randomized to the isometric strength training group (isometric group) performed six different isometric strength training exercises involving the hip knee and ankle three times per week for 16 weeks using TheraBand® elastic bands to generate resistance. All subjects in both strength-training groups completed at least 70% of their prescribed exercise sessions, which included one weekly-supervised exercise session and two unsupervised weekly exercise sessions. The 35 subjects in the control group were not given an exercise intervention over the 16-week duration of the study. Subjects in all three groups did not significantly change the amount of medications they consumed to treat their knee joint pain over the duration of the study. All analysis used .05 as the level of statistical significance. Repeated measures ANOVA with bonferroni post hoc analysis indicated the isometric group significantly decreased their time while performing all four functional tasks by 16-23%. These analyses also indicated the dynamic group significantly decreased their time while descending and ascending stairs by 13-17%. The control group did not change their time when performing any of the functional tasks. Both strength training groups significantly decreased the degree of pain in their knees while performing all four of the functional tasks by 28-58%. The control group did not change their report of pain while completing the functional tasks. The self-report measures of functional ability and pain indicated that both the dynamic and isometric group significantly improved their functional ability and decreased their pain over the duration of the study while the control group reported no change in these variables. These findings indicate that 16 weeks of either dynamic or isometric strength training can improve the actual and self-reported functional ability and reduce the knee joint pain of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Future research may wish to examine the long-term effects of strength training on the natural progression of the OA of the knee. Clinicians may chose to introduce either isometric or dynamic strength training as an intervention designed to decrease the pain and increase the functional ability of their patients with OA of the knee.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effect of two different types of strength training on joint pain and functional ability among individuals with osteoarthritis of the kneeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148341-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The effect of two different types of strength training on joint pain and functional ability among individuals with osteoarthritis of the knee</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Topp, Robert, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Georgia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rtopp@mco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common, progressive health problems among adults. It is estimated that 80% of all adults age 65 years and older exhibit radiographic evidence of OA. A majority of these adults have OA related pain which is thought to contribute to 10-25% of all visits to primary care physicians. Furthermore, when symptoms of the disease affect the knee, as in 10% of all adults, it results in a limited ability to complete activities of daily living. Previous observational studies have indicated a significant relationship between measures of declines in physical fitness and declines in functional ability. A limited number of investigators have demonstrated diverse exercise interventions can decrease self- reports of joint pain and increase self-reported functional ability among OA patients. No study has yet compared dynamic versus isometric strength training on the actual performance of functional activities or the joint pain while performing these activities among patients with OA of the knee. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of 16 weeks of isometric versus dynamic strength training versus a control condition on knee pain and functional abilities among adults with knee OA. A total of 102 subjects with a documented diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the knee were randomized into one of three groups and completed a 16-week protocol. Prior to randomization and following 16 weeks of their respective group intervention each subject completed an assessment of their knee pain and functional ability. Functional ability was assessed as the shortest duration in seconds of three trials to complete each of four functional tasks. These tasks included descending and ascending a flight of 27 stairs and transferring from a standing to a supine position on the floor and transferring from a supine position on the floor to standing upright. Pain was assessed by asking the subject to indicate the degree of pain in their knees using a visual analog scale immediately following performing each of the four functional tasks. Functional ability and pain were also assessed through self-reported using the WOMAC and MOS-36 paper and pencil assessment tools. The 35 subjects who were randomized to the dynamic strength training group (dynamic group) performed six different dynamic strength training exercises involving the hip, knee and ankle, using TheraBand&reg; elastic bands to generate resistance, three times per week for 16 weeks. The 32 subjects who were randomized to the isometric strength training group (isometric group) performed six different isometric strength training exercises involving the hip knee and ankle three times per week for 16 weeks using TheraBand&reg; elastic bands to generate resistance. All subjects in both strength-training groups completed at least 70% of their prescribed exercise sessions, which included one weekly-supervised exercise session and two unsupervised weekly exercise sessions. The 35 subjects in the control group were not given an exercise intervention over the 16-week duration of the study. Subjects in all three groups did not significantly change the amount of medications they consumed to treat their knee joint pain over the duration of the study. All analysis used .05 as the level of statistical significance. Repeated measures ANOVA with bonferroni post hoc analysis indicated the isometric group significantly decreased their time while performing all four functional tasks by 16-23%. These analyses also indicated the dynamic group significantly decreased their time while descending and ascending stairs by 13-17%. The control group did not change their time when performing any of the functional tasks. Both strength training groups significantly decreased the degree of pain in their knees while performing all four of the functional tasks by 28-58%. The control group did not change their report of pain while completing the functional tasks. The self-report measures of functional ability and pain indicated that both the dynamic and isometric group significantly improved their functional ability and decreased their pain over the duration of the study while the control group reported no change in these variables. These findings indicate that 16 weeks of either dynamic or isometric strength training can improve the actual and self-reported functional ability and reduce the knee joint pain of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Future research may wish to examine the long-term effects of strength training on the natural progression of the OA of the knee. Clinicians may chose to introduce either isometric or dynamic strength training as an intervention designed to decrease the pain and increase the functional ability of their patients with OA of the knee.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:45Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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