The Effects of Therapeutic Back Massage on Psychophysiologic Variables and Immune Function in Spouses of Patients with Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148348
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Therapeutic Back Massage on Psychophysiologic Variables and Immune Function in Spouses of Patients with Cancer
Abstract:
The Effects of Therapeutic Back Massage on Psychophysiologic Variables and Immune Function in Spouses of Patients with Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Goodfellow, Linda
P.I. Institution Name:Duquesne University
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to test: 1) the efficacy of therapeutic back massage (TBM) as a method to reduce stress associated with negative change in natural killer cell activity (NKCA) in spouses of cancer patients; 2) whether TBM positively influences psychophysiologic factors in spouses of cancer patients experiencing stress; and, 3) to gather preliminary data to use in future studies on psychosocial factors relative to NKCA. Design: This between group experimental design measured subjects randomly assigned to two groups (experimental, control) at three time points (pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, 20 minutes post-intervention) to examine the effects of TBM. The experimental group received TBM for 20 minutes while the control group read for 20 minutes. Sample: Both male and female spouses (N = 42), less than 66 years of age, whose partners were diagnosed with cancer for at least two months and were actively being treated for cancer, were included in this study. Setting: This study was conducted at a General Clinical Research Center in a university medical center. Names of Variables: TBM was the independent variable in this study. The major dependent variables were measured at the three time points and included mood, perceived stress, heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and NKCA. Measures/Instruments: Data obtained from the Health Screening Assessment Form, the Demographic Data Sheet, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD) were used to determine subject eligibility. Data were also collected on psychosocial variables that have been found to influence NKCA including depression measured by the Profile of Mood Scale (POMS) – Depression, loneliness measured by the UCLA Loneliness Scale, and marital disruption measured by the Marital-Adjustment Test. Mood was measured by the POMS by obtaining a total mood disturbance score and perceived stress was measured by a visual analogue scale. Physiologic measures included HR, SBP, DBP, and NKCA. Findings: Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance tests were conducted to determine the effects of TBM on mood, perceived stress, NKCA, HR, SBP, and DBP over time and yielded significant group X time interactions on mood [F(2, 40) = 14.61, p = .0005] and perceived stress [F(2, 40) = 28.66, p = .001]. Three of the six primary mood factors used to measure mood showed significant change over the two post-intervention time points including tension [F(2, 40) = 5.18, p = .0001], depression [F(2, 40) = 11.98, p = .0013], and fatigue [F(2, 40) = 12.11, p = .0012]. No significant interactions were found between NKCA or the physiologic measures and TBM, although each of these measures did change in the expected direction. A significant inverse relationship was found between mood and NKCA at baseline (Pearson’s r = -0.41, p = .009). Data collected on measures of depression, loneliness, marital disruption, demographics, and health were correlated with each other and NKCA to determine any potential relationships. A significant inverse relationship was found between depression and NKCA (Pearson’s r = -0.41, p = .008). A significant relationship was also found between depression and loneliness (Pearson’s r = .58, p = .0001), but not between loneliness and NKCA (Pearson’s r = -0.28, p = .07). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that TBM is an effective nursing intervention to improve mood and decrease perceived stress, tension, depression, and fatigue in spouses of patients with cancer. This study also provided evidence that psychosocial variables such as mood and depression may influence NKCA in spouses of cancer patients. Implications: Until now, scant attention has been given to help spouses of cancer patients reduce stress associated with their partners’ illness. Nurses should educate spouses of cancer patients on the benefits of massage as a method to reduce stress associated with an ill partner. The relationships found between depression, loneliness, and NKCA are important for nurse researchers to consider in future studies of this nature. Results suggest that future studies utilize a longitudinal design to further examine the effects of TBM and psychosocial factors that may influence immune function in spouses of patients with patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Therapeutic Back Massage on Psychophysiologic Variables and Immune Function in Spouses of Patients with Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148348-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Therapeutic Back Massage on Psychophysiologic Variables and Immune Function in Spouses of Patients with Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Goodfellow, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Duquesne University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">goodfellow@duq.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: The purpose of this study was to test: 1) the efficacy of therapeutic back massage (TBM) as a method to reduce stress associated with negative change in natural killer cell activity (NKCA) in spouses of cancer patients; 2) whether TBM positively influences psychophysiologic factors in spouses of cancer patients experiencing stress; and, 3) to gather preliminary data to use in future studies on psychosocial factors relative to NKCA. Design: This between group experimental design measured subjects randomly assigned to two groups (experimental, control) at three time points (pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, 20 minutes post-intervention) to examine the effects of TBM. The experimental group received TBM for 20 minutes while the control group read for 20 minutes. Sample: Both male and female spouses (N = 42), less than 66 years of age, whose partners were diagnosed with cancer for at least two months and were actively being treated for cancer, were included in this study. Setting: This study was conducted at a General Clinical Research Center in a university medical center. Names of Variables: TBM was the independent variable in this study. The major dependent variables were measured at the three time points and included mood, perceived stress, heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and NKCA. Measures/Instruments: Data obtained from the Health Screening Assessment Form, the Demographic Data Sheet, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD) were used to determine subject eligibility. Data were also collected on psychosocial variables that have been found to influence NKCA including depression measured by the Profile of Mood Scale (POMS) &ndash; Depression, loneliness measured by the UCLA Loneliness Scale, and marital disruption measured by the Marital-Adjustment Test. Mood was measured by the POMS by obtaining a total mood disturbance score and perceived stress was measured by a visual analogue scale. Physiologic measures included HR, SBP, DBP, and NKCA. Findings: Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance tests were conducted to determine the effects of TBM on mood, perceived stress, NKCA, HR, SBP, and DBP over time and yielded significant group X time interactions on mood [F(2, 40) = 14.61, p = .0005] and perceived stress [F(2, 40) = 28.66, p = .001]. Three of the six primary mood factors used to measure mood showed significant change over the two post-intervention time points including tension [F(2, 40) = 5.18, p = .0001], depression [F(2, 40) = 11.98, p = .0013], and fatigue [F(2, 40) = 12.11, p = .0012]. No significant interactions were found between NKCA or the physiologic measures and TBM, although each of these measures did change in the expected direction. A significant inverse relationship was found between mood and NKCA at baseline (Pearson&rsquo;s r = -0.41, p = .009). Data collected on measures of depression, loneliness, marital disruption, demographics, and health were correlated with each other and NKCA to determine any potential relationships. A significant inverse relationship was found between depression and NKCA (Pearson&rsquo;s r = -0.41, p = .008). A significant relationship was also found between depression and loneliness (Pearson&rsquo;s r = .58, p = .0001), but not between loneliness and NKCA (Pearson&rsquo;s r = -0.28, p = .07). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that TBM is an effective nursing intervention to improve mood and decrease perceived stress, tension, depression, and fatigue in spouses of patients with cancer. This study also provided evidence that psychosocial variables such as mood and depression may influence NKCA in spouses of cancer patients. Implications: Until now, scant attention has been given to help spouses of cancer patients reduce stress associated with their partners&rsquo; illness. Nurses should educate spouses of cancer patients on the benefits of massage as a method to reduce stress associated with an ill partner. The relationships found between depression, loneliness, and NKCA are important for nurse researchers to consider in future studies of this nature. Results suggest that future studies utilize a longitudinal design to further examine the effects of TBM and psychosocial factors that may influence immune function in spouses of patients with patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:51Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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