Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Hispanic, Native American, and White Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148349
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Hispanic, Native American, and White Children
Abstract:
Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Hispanic, Native American, and White Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Bindler, Ruth
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Objectives: to describe the study population of participating children regarding factors related to cardiovascular disease risk, and to examine and test relationships between serum measurements and lifestyle factors. Design: A quasi-experimental design was used in this descriptive research study. Sample: A convenience sample of 100 (48 male and 52 female) multi-ethnic children in 4th through 8th grades (9-15 years of age) in a central Washington State school district comprised the sample. Fifteen children were Native American, 64 were Hispanic, 9 were White, and the remaining children were from mixed ethnic heritage. Setting: Data were gathered from parents at evening meetings at school, and from children during school hours in the school nurse office. Data collection took place in May and October 2000. Variables/Concepts: Concepts examined as important factors in cardiovascular disease were dietary intake, lifestyle behaviors, and serum levels of lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin and homocysteine. Variations among three major ethnic groups were examined. Measures/Instruments: Physical measurements of children included height, weight, blood pressure, triceps skinfold thickness, and Canadian Aerobic Fitness Test (for calculation of VO2 peak); questionnaires included demographic, family medical and child medical histories (by parent), and smoking questionnaire, physical activity questionnaire, 24-hour diet recall, and Youth Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire (for children); and serum cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, and homocysteine on children. Findings: Forty-seven percent of the children were at or above the 85th percentile (recommended level for identification of children at risk of overweight) for body mass index, using newly available norms from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Average total cholesterol level was 165 mg/dL; however 31% of the children demonstrated levels in the borderline high or high ranges as identified by the United States National Cholesterol Education Program. Approximately 50% of the children had LDL-C levels in the borderline high or high ranges. Thirty-three percent of the children performed below average level on a fitness test to determine VO2 peak. Significant differences were found among ethnic groups’ fasting insulin levels, with 50% of variance explained by gender, age, body mass index percentile, serum glucose, HDL-C, and diastolic blood pressure. Additional descriptive data will be provided about the children, with relationships between dietary intake and serum levels of lipids, insulin and homocysteine, and comparisons of cardiovascular risk factors in the 3 major ethnic groups. Conclusion: Study data support the findings of Healthy People 2010 regarding the frequently identified higher health risks of ethnic minorities. Findings demonstrate that such ethnic disparities begin during childhood. Results lend credence to the public health crisis of increasing weight and decreasing physical fitness in America’s youth, a situation that will likely lead to increased cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other disease states as these children become adults. Implications: Suggestions for future research with children of various ethnic groups as well as pertinent intervention strategies will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCardiovascular Risk Factors in Hispanic, Native American, and White Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148349-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Hispanic, Native American, and White Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bindler, Ruth</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bindler@wsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: to describe the study population of participating children regarding factors related to cardiovascular disease risk, and to examine and test relationships between serum measurements and lifestyle factors. Design: A quasi-experimental design was used in this descriptive research study. Sample: A convenience sample of 100 (48 male and 52 female) multi-ethnic children in 4th through 8th grades (9-15 years of age) in a central Washington State school district comprised the sample. Fifteen children were Native American, 64 were Hispanic, 9 were White, and the remaining children were from mixed ethnic heritage. Setting: Data were gathered from parents at evening meetings at school, and from children during school hours in the school nurse office. Data collection took place in May and October 2000. Variables/Concepts: Concepts examined as important factors in cardiovascular disease were dietary intake, lifestyle behaviors, and serum levels of lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin and homocysteine. Variations among three major ethnic groups were examined. Measures/Instruments: Physical measurements of children included height, weight, blood pressure, triceps skinfold thickness, and Canadian Aerobic Fitness Test (for calculation of VO2 peak); questionnaires included demographic, family medical and child medical histories (by parent), and smoking questionnaire, physical activity questionnaire, 24-hour diet recall, and Youth Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire (for children); and serum cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, and homocysteine on children. Findings: Forty-seven percent of the children were at or above the 85th percentile (recommended level for identification of children at risk of overweight) for body mass index, using newly available norms from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Average total cholesterol level was 165 mg/dL; however 31% of the children demonstrated levels in the borderline high or high ranges as identified by the United States National Cholesterol Education Program. Approximately 50% of the children had LDL-C levels in the borderline high or high ranges. Thirty-three percent of the children performed below average level on a fitness test to determine VO2 peak. Significant differences were found among ethnic groups&rsquo; fasting insulin levels, with 50% of variance explained by gender, age, body mass index percentile, serum glucose, HDL-C, and diastolic blood pressure. Additional descriptive data will be provided about the children, with relationships between dietary intake and serum levels of lipids, insulin and homocysteine, and comparisons of cardiovascular risk factors in the 3 major ethnic groups. Conclusion: Study data support the findings of Healthy People 2010 regarding the frequently identified higher health risks of ethnic minorities. Findings demonstrate that such ethnic disparities begin during childhood. Results lend credence to the public health crisis of increasing weight and decreasing physical fitness in America&rsquo;s youth, a situation that will likely lead to increased cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other disease states as these children become adults. Implications: Suggestions for future research with children of various ethnic groups as well as pertinent intervention strategies will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:52Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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