Outcomes of a Home Based Nursing Intervention for Irritable Infant

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148351
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of a Home Based Nursing Intervention for Irritable Infant
Abstract:
Outcomes of a Home Based Nursing Intervention for Irritable Infant
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Lobo, Marie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Medical University of South Carolina
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The purpose of this paper is to describe the outcome used in Managing Irritable Infants: A Clinical Trial and the preliminary findings from those measures. Design: this is a prospective study using a case control, pre and posttest design. The sample will include 160 infants from two clinical sites, one in the Southeastern and one in the Southwestern United States. Sample: Subjects were normal, healthy, full-term infants 2 to 6 weeks of age at entry and crying on average of greater than 2/5 hours per day and their mothers, living in the metro area of the research site. 61 subjects entered into the study, 35 subjects at the Southeastern site and 36 at the Southwestern site. Data from a total of 54 infants are reported in this paper: 34 experimental infants, mean age of 4.1, 20 males and 15 females, compared to 20 controls, mean age of 4.2, 6 males and 13 females. Setting: All data were collected in the home of the participant. Concepts and Measures: Data collected at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks include the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) a measure of perceived stress by the parents. The PSI has been used extensively with families with children from birth through adolescence. The Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scale (NCAFS) was used to measure the quality of the parent-infant interaction. The Fussiness Rating Scale (FRS) was used to record amount of crying, perceived intensity and amount the crying bothered the parents on a weekly basis. All data were collected in the home. Findings: There were no detectable differences at baseline between control and experimental parents and infants on any variable. Both groups showed a decrease in crying, over the 8 weeks, however the intervention babies showed a greater decrease in amount of crying and decrease in intensity of crying. Parents in both groups reported decrease stress over the 8 week as measured by the PSI at three points in time. The quality of parent infant interaction improved in both groups as measured by the NCAFS at three points in time. Implications: A home based intervention program with families with irritable infants can result in decreased stress and increased quality of parent-infant interaction. As found in other studies the amount of infant crying decreases as they mature. The presence of a nurse in the home to collect data may also be affecting parental perception. Currently, the research team is collecting data on infants who are referred to the study too late for the intervention (8 – 12 weeks). Data collection is continuing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of a Home Based Nursing Intervention for Irritable Infanten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148351-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Outcomes of a Home Based Nursing Intervention for Irritable Infant</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lobo, Marie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical University of South Carolina</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lobom1@musc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this paper is to describe the outcome used in Managing Irritable Infants: A Clinical Trial and the preliminary findings from those measures. Design: this is a prospective study using a case control, pre and posttest design. The sample will include 160 infants from two clinical sites, one in the Southeastern and one in the Southwestern United States. Sample: Subjects were normal, healthy, full-term infants 2 to 6 weeks of age at entry and crying on average of greater than 2/5 hours per day and their mothers, living in the metro area of the research site. 61 subjects entered into the study, 35 subjects at the Southeastern site and 36 at the Southwestern site. Data from a total of 54 infants are reported in this paper: 34 experimental infants, mean age of 4.1, 20 males and 15 females, compared to 20 controls, mean age of 4.2, 6 males and 13 females. Setting: All data were collected in the home of the participant. Concepts and Measures: Data collected at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks include the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) a measure of perceived stress by the parents. The PSI has been used extensively with families with children from birth through adolescence. The Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scale (NCAFS) was used to measure the quality of the parent-infant interaction. The Fussiness Rating Scale (FRS) was used to record amount of crying, perceived intensity and amount the crying bothered the parents on a weekly basis. All data were collected in the home. Findings: There were no detectable differences at baseline between control and experimental parents and infants on any variable. Both groups showed a decrease in crying, over the 8 weeks, however the intervention babies showed a greater decrease in amount of crying and decrease in intensity of crying. Parents in both groups reported decrease stress over the 8 week as measured by the PSI at three points in time. The quality of parent infant interaction improved in both groups as measured by the NCAFS at three points in time. Implications: A home based intervention program with families with irritable infants can result in decreased stress and increased quality of parent-infant interaction. As found in other studies the amount of infant crying decreases as they mature. The presence of a nurse in the home to collect data may also be affecting parental perception. Currently, the research team is collecting data on infants who are referred to the study too late for the intervention (8 &ndash; 12 weeks). Data collection is continuing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:54Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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