Eventually It’ll Be Over: The Dialectic Between Confinement and Freedom in the Phenomenal World of the Hospitalized Patient

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148352
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Eventually It’ll Be Over: The Dialectic Between Confinement and Freedom in the Phenomenal World of the Hospitalized Patient
Abstract:
Eventually It’ll Be Over: The Dialectic Between Confinement and Freedom in the Phenomenal World of the Hospitalized Patient
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Shattell, Mona
Objective: the purpose of this study was to explore hospitalized patients’ experience of the environment. Although millions of dollars are spent each year on hospital redesign efforts, little is known about patients’ responses to features such as painting, wallcoverings, and floors. Theoretical models about customer-pleasing decor in the marketing and administration literature are based on research in airports and retail stores, failing to consider how radically different hospitals are from retail establishments that customers patronize voluntarily. Within nursing, environment has been the least studied concept of the metaparadigm. Only a few previous studies were located by an intensive literature review. Design: To discover what patients are aware of in the hospital environment, without directing them to focus on specific aspects pre-judged to be important by researchers, a phenomenological design was employed, following the procedure outlined by Thomas and Pollio. Sample: Nine patients ranging in age from 28 to 86 were interviewed. Participants had to be at least 21 years of age, not seriously ill or acutely distressed at the time of the interview, and willing to talk to researchers about their experience. Participants provided informed consent. Setting: Three large metropolitan general hospitals were chosen as sites for data collection. Researchers targeted a range of hospital units in an attempt to achieve a wide variation in experience. Oncology, labor and delivery, coronary care, transitional care, and psychiatry were represented in the sample. Charge nurses of units recommended potential participants. Phenomenon of Interest: the phenomenon of interest in this study was the patient’s experience of his/her environment. Method and Procedure: Nondirective, in-depth phenomenological interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for meaning units and themes. Findings: Hospitalized patients spoke of the world of the hospital as a constant dialectic between confinement and freedom, connection and disconnection. Unexpectedly, the thematic structure of the environment for medical patients was diametrically opposed to that of psychiatric patients. For medical patients, the hospital was an environment of danger and insecurity whereas for psychiatric patients, it provided sale refuge from their self-destructive impulses. Medical patients longed for release, while psychiatric patients feared discharge. Conclusions: Narratives of all patients revealed considerable loneliness and disconnection, punctuated by brief moments of interaction with doctors, nurses, housekeepers, and visitors. Patients expected and wanted greater individual attention from staff. Scant mention was made of physical features of the environment, with the exceptions of windows, which were very important in providing patients the “vicarious consumption of free places” described by Goffman (1961). Implications: Findings from this study have many implications for nursing practice, such as finding new ways to decrease patients’ sense of confinement, creating more openness and freedom, lessening danger and insecurity, and establishing satisfying nurse-patient relationships.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEventually It’ll Be Over: The Dialectic Between Confinement and Freedom in the Phenomenal World of the Hospitalized Patienten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148352-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Eventually It&rsquo;ll Be Over: The Dialectic Between Confinement and Freedom in the Phenomenal World of the Hospitalized Patient</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shattell, Mona</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Monas87883@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: the purpose of this study was to explore hospitalized patients&rsquo; experience of the environment. Although millions of dollars are spent each year on hospital redesign efforts, little is known about patients&rsquo; responses to features such as painting, wallcoverings, and floors. Theoretical models about customer-pleasing decor in the marketing and administration literature are based on research in airports and retail stores, failing to consider how radically different hospitals are from retail establishments that customers patronize voluntarily. Within nursing, environment has been the least studied concept of the metaparadigm. Only a few previous studies were located by an intensive literature review. Design: To discover what patients are aware of in the hospital environment, without directing them to focus on specific aspects pre-judged to be important by researchers, a phenomenological design was employed, following the procedure outlined by Thomas and Pollio. Sample: Nine patients ranging in age from 28 to 86 were interviewed. Participants had to be at least 21 years of age, not seriously ill or acutely distressed at the time of the interview, and willing to talk to researchers about their experience. Participants provided informed consent. Setting: Three large metropolitan general hospitals were chosen as sites for data collection. Researchers targeted a range of hospital units in an attempt to achieve a wide variation in experience. Oncology, labor and delivery, coronary care, transitional care, and psychiatry were represented in the sample. Charge nurses of units recommended potential participants. Phenomenon of Interest: the phenomenon of interest in this study was the patient&rsquo;s experience of his/her environment. Method and Procedure: Nondirective, in-depth phenomenological interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for meaning units and themes. Findings: Hospitalized patients spoke of the world of the hospital as a constant dialectic between confinement and freedom, connection and disconnection. Unexpectedly, the thematic structure of the environment for medical patients was diametrically opposed to that of psychiatric patients. For medical patients, the hospital was an environment of danger and insecurity whereas for psychiatric patients, it provided sale refuge from their self-destructive impulses. Medical patients longed for release, while psychiatric patients feared discharge. Conclusions: Narratives of all patients revealed considerable loneliness and disconnection, punctuated by brief moments of interaction with doctors, nurses, housekeepers, and visitors. Patients expected and wanted greater individual attention from staff. Scant mention was made of physical features of the environment, with the exceptions of windows, which were very important in providing patients the &ldquo;vicarious consumption of free places&rdquo; described by Goffman (1961). Implications: Findings from this study have many implications for nursing practice, such as finding new ways to decrease patients&rsquo; sense of confinement, creating more openness and freedom, lessening danger and insecurity, and establishing satisfying nurse-patient relationships.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:55Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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