Patterns of Use of Complementary/Alternative Medicine in Breast Cancer Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148353
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Use of Complementary/Alternative Medicine in Breast Cancer Patients
Abstract:
Patterns of Use of Complementary/Alternative Medicine in Breast Cancer Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Lengacher, Cecile
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Florida
Background: The use of CAM by the general population has increased by 25-50%. CAM is defined as methods used in the diagnosis, treatment and/or prevention of disease that complements mainstream medicine, as opposed to alternative therapies that are used as a direct substitute for mainstream medicine. Use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) by cancer patients appears to be increasing. With breast cancer being the second leading cause of cancer death among American women, there are increasing fears of morbidity and mortality, thus women with breast cancer may be seeking a variety of CAM treatments. Several studies on use of complementary therapies in cancer patients have been carried out in North America and Europe. However, there is presently a shortage of reliable information about the types of therapies being used, how patients are referred to these therapies, the reasons for choosing specific therapies, and whether some patients use CAM in a manner that may compromise the use and effectiveness of conventional breast cancer treatments. Study Design: Participant Population. By use of a descriptive survey design, 105 women with a diagnosis of breast cancer, ranging in age from 32-81(mean=58.6) were recruited from the community, community support groups and a cancer clinic. Of the sample, 93% were Caucasian , and 4% were African American. Procedures. Participants completed the Use of Complementary/Alternative Therapies Survey and a demographic data form. The Use of Complementary/Alternative Therapies Survey was designed by the investigators based upon classifications identified in the Office of Alternative Medicine. This was followed by completing a content validity index by a panel of experts who rated the content items. A content validity index of .89. was obtained. Based upon the results, 33 items were grouped into three major categories: Diet and Nutritional Supplements, Stress Reducing therapies and Traditional/Ethnic Medicine. Reliability of the entire instrument and three sub-scales was tested on 40 patients using Cronbach's Alpha. The alpha coefficient for the entire scale was high (.86), and the alpha coefficients for the three sub-scales were as follows: Diet and Health Food Supplements (.59); Stress Reduction (.77); and Traditional/Ethnic Medicines (.83). Findings: Of the 33 complementary treatments surveyed, all but one of the 33 therapies was used by at least one of the participants. The most commonly used therapies were vitamin/mineral supplements (73%), prayer(59%), support groups(50%), humor therapy(43%) and antioxidants(39%). In addition, a significant correlation was found in this study. There was a positive correlation between satisfaction with one’s primary physician and satisfaction with use of complementary treatments (r=. 277, P<. 05). This result, which is somewhat counterintuitive, suggests that as satisfaction with the primary physician increases, satisfaction with alternative treatments also increases. Implications: Once reliable patterns of use are obtained, nursing will be better prepared to rigorously examine the efficacy of CAM (e.g. through randomized controlled trials), which may ultimately improve patient survival and quality of life. As previously stated, although increases in use of individual CAM have been cited in the literature, reliable patterns, and prevalence estimates and identification of factors related to use of CAM by patients with breast cancer have not been adequately documented. This is a pilot study, serving as a basis to further investigate other factors associated with use of CAM.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Use of Complementary/Alternative Medicine in Breast Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148353-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Use of Complementary/Alternative Medicine in Breast Cancer Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lengacher, Cecile</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">clengach@hsc.usf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The use of CAM by the general population has increased by 25-50%. CAM is defined as methods used in the diagnosis, treatment and/or prevention of disease that complements mainstream medicine, as opposed to alternative therapies that are used as a direct substitute for mainstream medicine. Use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) by cancer patients appears to be increasing. With breast cancer being the second leading cause of cancer death among American women, there are increasing fears of morbidity and mortality, thus women with breast cancer may be seeking a variety of CAM treatments. Several studies on use of complementary therapies in cancer patients have been carried out in North America and Europe. However, there is presently a shortage of reliable information about the types of therapies being used, how patients are referred to these therapies, the reasons for choosing specific therapies, and whether some patients use CAM in a manner that may compromise the use and effectiveness of conventional breast cancer treatments. Study Design: Participant Population. By use of a descriptive survey design, 105 women with a diagnosis of breast cancer, ranging in age from 32-81(mean=58.6) were recruited from the community, community support groups and a cancer clinic. Of the sample, 93% were Caucasian , and 4% were African American. Procedures. Participants completed the Use of Complementary/Alternative Therapies Survey and a demographic data form. The Use of Complementary/Alternative Therapies Survey was designed by the investigators based upon classifications identified in the Office of Alternative Medicine. This was followed by completing a content validity index by a panel of experts who rated the content items. A content validity index of .89. was obtained. Based upon the results, 33 items were grouped into three major categories: Diet and Nutritional Supplements, Stress Reducing therapies and Traditional/Ethnic Medicine. Reliability of the entire instrument and three sub-scales was tested on 40 patients using Cronbach's Alpha. The alpha coefficient for the entire scale was high (.86), and the alpha coefficients for the three sub-scales were as follows: Diet and Health Food Supplements (.59); Stress Reduction (.77); and Traditional/Ethnic Medicines (.83). Findings: Of the 33 complementary treatments surveyed, all but one of the 33 therapies was used by at least one of the participants. The most commonly used therapies were vitamin/mineral supplements (73%), prayer(59%), support groups(50%), humor therapy(43%) and antioxidants(39%). In addition, a significant correlation was found in this study. There was a positive correlation between satisfaction with one&rsquo;s primary physician and satisfaction with use of complementary treatments (r=. 277, P&lt;. 05). This result, which is somewhat counterintuitive, suggests that as satisfaction with the primary physician increases, satisfaction with alternative treatments also increases. Implications: Once reliable patterns of use are obtained, nursing will be better prepared to rigorously examine the efficacy of CAM (e.g. through randomized controlled trials), which may ultimately improve patient survival and quality of life. As previously stated, although increases in use of individual CAM have been cited in the literature, reliable patterns, and prevalence estimates and identification of factors related to use of CAM by patients with breast cancer have not been adequately documented. This is a pilot study, serving as a basis to further investigate other factors associated with use of CAM.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:43:56Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:43:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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